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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

[73] Serieux and Libert, "La Bastille et ses Prisonniers," _L'Encephale_, 

September, 1911. 

 

[74] Witry, "Notes Historiques sur l'Homosexualite en France," _Revue de 

l'Hypnotisme_, January, 1909. 

 

[75] In early Teutonic days there was little or no trace of any punishment 

for homosexual practices in Germany. This, according to Hermann Michaelis, 

only appeared after the Church had gained power among the West Goths; in 

the Breviarium of Alaric II (506), the sodomist was condemned to the 

stake, and later, in the seventh century, by an edict of King 

Chindasvinds, to castration. The Frankish capitularies of Charlemange's 

time adopted ecclesiastical penances. In the thirteenth and fourteenth 

centuries death by fire was ordained, and the punishments enacted by the 

German codes tended to become much more ferocious than that edicted by the 

Justinian code on which they were modelled. 

 

[76] Raffalovich discusses German friendship, _Uranisme et Unisexualite_, 

pp. 157-9. See also Birnbaum, _Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, Bd. 

viii, p. 611; he especially illustrates this kind of friendship by the 

correspondence of the poets Gleim and Jacobi, who used to each other the 

language of lovers, which, indeed, they constantly called themselves. 

 

[77] This letter may be found in Ernst Schur's _Heinrich von Kleist in 

seinen Briefen_, p. 295. Dr. J. Sadger has written a pathographic and 

psychological study of Kleist, emphasizing the homosexual strain, in the 

_Grenzfragen des Nerven- und Seelenlebens_ series. 

 

[78] Alexander's not less distinguished brother, Wilhelm von Humboldt, 

though not homosexual, possessed, a woman wrote to him, "the soul of a 

woman and the most tender feeling for womanliness I have ever found in 

your sex;" he himself admitted the feminine traits in his nature. Spranger 

(_Wilhelm von Humboldt_, p. 288) says of him that "he had that dual 

sexuality without which the moral summits of humanity cannot be reached." 

 

[79] Krupp caused much scandal by his life at Capri, where he was 

constantly surrounded by the handsome youths of the place, mandolinists 

and street arabs, with whom he was on familiar terms, and on whom he 

lavished money. H.D. Davray, a reliable eyewitness, has written "Souvenirs 

sur M. Krupp a Capri," _L'Europeen_, 29 November, 1902. It is not, 

however, definitely agreed that Krupp was of fully developed homosexual 

temperament (see, e.g., _Jahrbuch f. sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, Bd. v, p. 

1303 et seq.) An account of his life at Capri was published in the 

_Vorwaerts_, against which Krupp finally brought a libel action; but he 

died immediately afterward, it is widely believed, by his own hand, and 

the libel action was withdrawn. 

 

[80] Madame, the mother of the Regent, in her letters of 12th October, 4th 

November, and 13th December, 1701, repeatedly makes this assertion, and 

implies that it was supported by the English who at that time came over to 

Paris with the English Ambassador, Lord Portland. The King was very 

indifferent to women. 

 

[81] Anselm, Epistola lxii, in Migne's _Patrologia_, vol. clix, col. 95. 

John of Salisbury, in his _Polycrates_, describes the homosexual and 

effeminate habits of his time. 

 

[82] Pollock and Maitland, _History of English Law_, vol. ii, p. 556. 

 

[83] Coleridge in his _Table Talk_ (14 May, 1833) remarked: "A man may, 

under certain states of the moral feeling, entertain something deserving 

the name of love towards a male object--an affection beyond friendship, 

and wholly aloof from appetite. In Elizabeth's and James's time it seems 

to have been almost fashionable to cherish such a feeling. Certainly the 

language of the two friends Musidorus and Pyrocles in the _Arcadia_ is 

such as we could not use except to women." This passage of Coleridge's is 

interesting as an early English recognition by a distinguished man of 

genius of what may be termed ideal homosexuality. 

 

[84] See account of Udall in the _National Dictionary of Biography_. 

 

[85] _Complete Poems of Richard Barnfield_, edited with an introduction by 

A.B. Grosart, 1876. The poems of Barnfield were also edited by Arber, in 

the English Scholar's Library, 1883. Arber, who always felt much horror 

for the abnormal, argues that Barnfield's occupation with homosexual 


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