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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

account, and that he had "omitted to perceive that there are inevitable 

points of contact between sexual inversion and his doctrine of 

friendship." He recalls, however, Whitman's own lines at the end of 

"Calamus" in the Camden edition of 1876:-- 

 

"Here my last words, and the most baffling, 

Here the frailest leaves of me, and yet my strongest-lasting, 

Here I shade down and hide my thoughts--I do not expose them, 

And yet they expose me more than all my other poems." 

 

[97] Whitman's letters to Peter Doyle, an uncultured young tram-conductor 

deeply loved by the poet, have been edited by Dr. Bucke, and published at 

Boston: _Calamus: A Series of Letters_, 1897. 

 

[98] Whitman acknowledged, however (as in the letter to Symonds already 

referred to), that he had had six children; they appear to have been born 

in the earlier part of his life when he lived in the South. (See a chapter 

on Walt Whitman's children in Edward Carpenter's interesting book, _Days 

with Walt Whitman_, 1906.) Yet his brother George Whitman said: "I never 

knew Walt to fall in love with young girls, or even to show them marked 

attention." And Doyle, who knew him intimately during ten years of late 

life, said: "Women in that sense never came into his head." The early 

heterosexual relationship seems to have been an exception in his life. 

With regard to the number of children I am informed that, in the opinion 

of a lady who knew Whitman in the South, there can be no reasonable doubt 

as to the existence of one child, but that when enumerating six he 

possibly included grandchildren. 

 

[99] While the homosexual strain in Walt Whitman has been more or less 

definitely admitted by various writers, the most vigorous attempts to 

present the homosexual character of his personality and work are due to 

Eduard Bertz in Germany, and to Dr. W.C. Rivers in England. Bertz has 

issued three publications on Whitman: see especially his _Der 

Yankee-Heiland_, 1906, and _Whitman-Mysterien_, 1907. The arguments of 

Rivers are concisely stated in a pamphlet entitled _Walt Whitman's 

Anomaly_ (London: George Allen, 1913). Both Bertz and Rivers emphasize the 

feminine traits in Whitman. An interesting independent picture of Whitman, 

at about the date of the letter to Symonds, accompanied by the author's 

excellent original photographs, is furnished by Dr. John Johnston, _A 

Visit to Walt Whitman_, 1898. It may be added that, probably, both the 

extent and the significance of the feminine traits in Whitman have been 

overestimated by some writers. Most artists and men of genius have some 

feminine traits; they do not prove the existence of inversion, nor does 

their absence disprove it. Dr. Clark Bell writes to me in reference to the 

little book by Dr. Rivers: "I knew Walt Whitman personally. To me Mr. 

Whitman was one of the most robust and virile of men, extraordinarily so. 

He was from my standpoint not feminine at all, but physically masculine 

and robust. The difficulty is that a virile and strong man who is poetic 

in temperament, ardent and tender, may have phases and moods of passion 

and emotion which are apt to be misinterpreted." A somewhat similar view, 

in opposition to Bertz and Rivers, has been vigorously set forth by 

Bazalgette (who has written a very thorough study of Whitman in French), 

especially in the _Mercure de France_ for 1st July, 1st Oct., and 15th 

Nov., 1913. 

 

[100] Lepelletier, in what may be regarded as the official biography of 

Verlaine (_Paul Verlaine_, 1907) seeks to minimize or explain away the 

homosexual aspect of the poet's life. So also Berrichon, Rimbaud's 

brother-in-law, _Mercure de France_, 16 July, 1911 and 1 Feb., 1912. P. 

Escoube, in a judicious essay (included in _Preferences_, 1913), presents 

a more reasonable view of this aspect of Verlaine's temperament. Even 

apart altogether from the evidence as to the poet's tendency to passionate 

friendship, there can be no appeal from the poems themselves, which 

clearly possess an absolute and unquestionable sincerity. 

 

[101] Sir Richard Burton, who helped to popularize this view, regarded the 

phenomenon as "geographical and climatic, not racial," and held that 

within what he called the Sotadic Zone "the vice is popular and endemic, 


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