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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

held at the worst to be a mere peccadillo, while the races to the north 

and south of the limits here defined practice it only sporadically, amid 

the opprobrium of their fellows, who, as a rule, are physically incapable 

of performing the operation, and look upon it with the liveliest disgust." 

He adds: "The only physical cause for the practice which suggests itself 

to me, and that must be owned to be purely conjectural, is that within the 

Sotadic Zone there is a blending of the masculine and feminine 

temperaments, a crasis which elsewhere only occurs sporadically" (_Arabian 

Nights_, 1885, vol. x, pp. 205-254). The theory of the Sotadic Zone fails 

to account for the custom among the Normans, Celts, Scythians, Bulgars, 

and Tartars, and, moreover, in various of these regions different views 

have prevailed at different periods. Burton was wholly unacquainted with 

the psychological investigations into sexual inversion which had, indeed, 

scarcely begun in his day. 

 

[102] Spectator (_Anthropophyteia_, vol. vii, 1910), referring especially 

to the neighborhood of Sorrento, states that the southern Italians regard 

passive _pedicatio_ as disgraceful, but attach little or no shame to 

active _pedicatio_. This indifference enables them to exploit the 

homosexual foreigners who are specially attracted to southern Italy in the 

development of a flourishing homosexual industry. 

 

[103] It is true that in the solitude of great modern cities it is 

possible for small homosexual coteries to form, in a certain sense, an 

environment of their own, favorable to their abnormality; yet this fact 

hardly modifies the general statement made in the text. 

 

[104] See especially Hirschfeld, _Die Homosexualitaet_, chs. xxiv and xxv. 

 

[105] Ulrichs, in his _Argonauticus_, in 1869, estimated the number as 

only 25,000, but admitted that this was probably a decided underestimate. 

Bloch (_Die Prostitution_, Bd. i, p. 792) has found reason to believe that 

in Cologne in the fifteenth century the percentage was nearly as high as 

Hirschfeld finds it today. A few years earlier Bloch had believed 

(_Beitraege_, part i, p. 215, 1902) that Hirschfeld's estimate of 2 per 

cent, was "sheer nonsense." 

 

[106] Hirschfeld mentions the case of two men, artists, one of them 

married, who were intimate friends for a great many years before each 

discovered that the other was an invert. 

 

[107] See articles by Numa Praetorius and Fernan, maintaining that 

homosexuality is at least as frequent in France (_Sexual-Probleme_, March 

and December, 1909). 

 

[108] Dr. Laupts, _L'Homosexualite_, 1910, pp. 413, 420. 

 

[109] Naecke, _Zeitschrift fuer Sexualwissenschaft_, 1908, Heft 6. 

 

[110] It is a fact significant of the French attitude toward homosexuality 

that the psychologist, Dr. Saint-Paul, when writing a book on this 

subject, though in a completely normal and correct manner, thought it 

desirable to adopt a pseudonym. 

 

[111] A well-informed series of papers dealing with English 

homosexuality generally, and especially with London (L. Pavia, "Die 

maennliche Homosexualitaet in England," _Vierteljahrsberichte des 

wissenschaftlich-humanitaeren Komitees_, 1909-1911) will be found 

instructive even by those who are familiar with London. And see also 

Hirschfeld, _Die Homosexualitaet_, ch. xxvi. Much information of historical 

nature concerning homosexuality in England will be found in Eugen Duehren 

(Iwan Bloch), _Das Geschlechtsleben in England_. 

 

[112] This: is doubtless the reason why so many English inverts establish 

themselves outside England. Paris, Florence, Nice, Naples, Cairo, and 

other places, are said to swarm with homosexual Englishmen. 


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