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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

passive part in their young days, continue practices of an active 

or passive kind; but only with boys already known to be 

homosexualists; they draw the line at corrupting fresh victims. 

This class realize more or less what they are about, but cannot 

be called a danger to the morals of pure boys. 

 

"(c) Young boys who, whether in the development of their own 

physical nature, or by the instruction of older boys of the class 

(a), find out the pleasures of masturbation or intercrural 

connection. (I never heard of a case of _pedicatio_ at my school, 

and only once of _fellatio_, which was attempted on a quite young 

boy, who complained to his house master, and the offender was 

expelled). Boys in this class have probably little or no idea of 

what sexual morality means, and can hardly be accused of a 

_moral_ offense at all. 

 

"I submit that these three classes should receive quite different 

treatment. Expulsion may occasionally be necessary for class (a), 

but the few who belong to this class are usually too cunning to 

get caught. It used to be notorious at school that it was almost 

always the wrong people who got dropped on. I do not think a boy 

in the other two classes should ever be expelled, and even when 

expulsion is unavoidable, it should, if possible, be deferred 

till the end of the term, so as to make it indistinguishable from 

an ordinary departure. After all, there is no reason to ruin a 

boy's prospects because he is a little beast at sixteen; there 

are very few hopeless incorrigibles at that age. 

 

"As regards the other two classes, I should begin by giving boys 

very much fuller enlightenment on sexual subjects than is usually 

done, before they go to a public school at all. Either a boy is 

pitchforked into the place in utter innocence and ignorance, and 

yields to temptations to do things which he vaguely, if at all, 

realizes are wrong, and that only because a puzzling sort of 

instinct tells him so; or else he is given just enough 

information to whet his curiosity, usually in the shape of 

warnings against certain apparently harmless bodily acts, which 

he not unnaturally tries out of curiosity, and finds them very 

pleasant. It may be undesirable that a boy should have full 

knowledge, at the time he goes to school, but it is more 

undesirable that he should go with a burning curiosity, or a 

total ignorance on the subject. I am convinced that much might 

be done in the way of prevention if boys were told more, and 

allowed to be _open_. Much of the pleasure of sexual talk among 

boys I believe to be due to the spurious interest aroused by the 

fact that it is forbidden fruit, and involves risk if caught. It 

seems to me that frankness is far more moral than suggestion. I 

would not 'expurgate' school editions of great authors; the frank 

obscenity of parts of Shakespeare is far less immoral than the 

prurient prudishness which declines to print it, but numbers the 

lines in such a way that the boy can go home and look up the 

omitted passage in a complete edition, with a distinct sense of 

guilt, which is where the harm comes in." 

 

It is probable that only a small proportion of homosexual boys in 

schools can properly be described as "vicious." A. Hoche, 

describing homosexuality in German schools ("Zuer Frage der 

forensischen Beurteilung sexuellen Vergehen," _Neurologisches 

Centralblatt_, 1896, No. 2), and putting together communications 

received from various medical men regarding their own youthful 

experiences at school, finds relationships of the kind very 

common, usually between boys of different ages and 

school-classes. According to one observer, the feminine, or 

passive, part was always played by a boy of girlish form and 

complexion, and the relationships were somewhat like those of 

normal lovers, with kissing, poems, love-letters, scenes of 

jealousy, sometimes visits to each other in bed, but without 

masturbation, pederasty, or other grossly physical 

manifestations. From his own youthful experience Hoche records 


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