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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

precisely similar observations, and remarks that the lovers were 

by no means recruited from the vicious elements in the school. 

(The elder scholars, of 21 or 22 years of age, formed regular 

sexual relationships with the servant-girls in the house.) It is 

probable that the homosexual relationships in English schools 

are, as a rule, not more vicious than those described by Hoche, 

but that the concealment in which they are wrapped leads to 

exaggeration. In the course of a discussion on this matter over 

thirty years ago, "Olim Etoniensis" wrote (_Journal of 

Education_, 1882, p. 85) that, on making a list of the vicious 

boys he had known at Eton, he found that "these very boys had 

become cabinet ministers, statesmen, officers, clergymen, 

country-gentlemen, etc., and that they are nearly all of them 

fathers of thriving families, respected and prosperous." But, as 

Marro has remarked, the question is not thus settled. Public 

distinction by no means necessarily implies any fine degree of 

private morality. 

 

Sometimes the manifestations thus appearing in schools or 

wherever youths are congregated together are not truly 

homosexual, but exhibit a more or less brutal or even sadistic 

perversion of the immature sexual instinct. This may be 

illustrated by the following narrative concerning a large London 

city warehouse: "A youth left my class at the age of 161/2," writes 

a correspondent, "to take up an apprenticeship in a large 

wholesale firm in G---- Street. Fortunately he went on probation 

of three weeks before articling. He came to me at the end of the 

first week asking me to intercede with his mother (he had no 

father) not to let him return. He told me that almost nightly, 

and especially when new fellows came, the youths in his dormitory 

(eleven in number) would waylay him, hold him down, and rub his 

parts to the tune of some comic song or dance-music. The boy who 

could choose the fastest time had the privilege of performing the 

operation, and most had to be the victim in turn unless new boys 

entered, when they would sometimes be subjected to this for a 

week. This boy, having been brought up strictly, was shocked, 

dazed, and alarmed; but they stopped him from calling out, and he 

dared not report it. Most boys entered direct on their 

apprenticeship without probation, and had no chance to get out. I 

procured the boy's release from the place and gave the manager to 

understand what went on." In such a case as this it has usually 

happened that a strong boy of brutal and perverse instincts and 

some force of character initiates proceedings which the others 

either fall into with complacency or are too weak to resist. 

 

Max Dessoir[127] came to the conclusion that "an undifferentiated sexual 

feeling is normal, on the average, during the first years of 

puberty,--i.e., from 13 to 15 in boys and from 12 to 14 in girls,--while 

in later years it must be regarded as pathological." He added very truly 

that in this early period the sexual emotion has not become centered in 

the sexual organs. This latter fact is certainly far too often forgotten 

by grown-up persons who suspect the idealized passion of boys and girls of 

a physical side which children have often no suspicion of, and would view 

with repulsion and horror. How far the sexual instinct may be said to be 

undifferentiated in early puberty as regards sex is a little doubtful. It 

is comparatively undifferentiated, but except in rare cases it is not 

absolutely undifferentiated. 

 

We have to admit, however, that, in the opinion of the latest 

physiologists of sex, such as Castle, Heape, and Marshall, each sex 

contains the latent characters of the other or recessive sex. Each sex is 

latent in the other, and each, as it contains the characters of both 

sexes (and can transmit those of the recessive sex) is latently 

hermaphrodite. A homosexual tendency may thus be regarded as simply the 

psychical manifestation of special characters of the recessive sex, 

susceptible of being evolved under changed circumstances, such as may 

occur near puberty, and associated with changed metabolism.[128] 


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