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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

In recent years Freud has accepted and developed the conception 

of the homosexual strain; as normal in early life. Thus, in 1905, 

in his "Bruchstueck einer Hysterie-Analyse" (reprinted in the 

second series of _Sammlung Kleiner Schriften zur Neurosenlehre_, 

1909), Freud regards it as a well-known fact that boys and girls 

at puberty normally show plain signs of the existence of a 

homosexual tendency. Under favorable circumstances this tendency 

is overcome, but when a happy heterosexual love is not 

established it remains liable to reappear under the influence of 

an appropriate stimulus. In the neurotic these homosexual germs 

are more highly developed. "I have never carried through any 

psychoanalysis of a man or a woman," Freud states, "without 

discovering a very significant homosexual tendency." Ferenczi, 

again (_Jahrbuch fuer Psychoanalytische Forschungen_, Bd. iii, 

1911, p. 119), without reference to any physical basis of the 

impulse, accepts "the psychic capacity of the child to direct his 

originally objectless eroticism to one or both sexes," and terms 

this disposition _ambisexuality_. The normality of a homosexual 

element in early life may be said to be accepted by most 

psychoanalysts, even of the schools that are separated from 

Freud. Stekel would go farther, and regards various psychic 

sexual anomalies as signs of a concealed bisexual tendency; 

psychic impotence, the admiration of men for masculine women and 

of women for feminine men, various forms of fetichism,--they are 

all masks of homosexuality (Stekel, _Zentralblatt fuer 

Psychoanalyse_, vol. ii, April, 1912). 

 

These schoolboy affections and passions arise, to a large extent, 

spontaneously, with the evolution of the sexual emotions, though the 

method of manifestation may be a matter of example or suggestion. As the 

sexual emotions become stronger, and as the lad leaves school or college 

to mix with men and women in the world, the instinct usually turns into 

the normal channel, in which channel the instincts of the majority of boys 

have been directed from the earliest appearance of puberty, if not 

earlier. But a certain proportion remain insensitive to the influence of 

women, and these may be regarded as true sexual inverts. Some of them are 

probably individuals of somewhat undeveloped sexual instincts. The members 

of this group are of some interest psychologically, although from the 

comparative quiescence of their sexual emotions they have received little 

attention. The following communication which I have received from a 

well-accredited source is noteworthy from this point of view:-- 

 

"The following facts may possibly be of interest to you, though 

my statement of them is necessarily general and vague. I happen 

to know intimately three cases of men whose affections have 

chiefly been directed exclusively to persons of their own sex. 

The first, having practised masturbation as a boy, and then for 

some ten years ceased to practise it (to such an extent that he 

even inhibited his erotic dreams), has since recurred to it 

deliberately (at about fortnightly intervals) as a substitute for 

copulation, for which he has never felt the least desire. But 

occasionally, when sleeping with a male friend, he has emissions 

in the act of embracing. The second is constantly and to an 

abnormal extent (I should say) troubled with erotic dreams and 

emissions, and takes drugs, by doctor's advice, to reduce this 

activity. He has recently developed a sexual interest in women, 

but for ethical and other reasons does not copulate with them. Of 

the third I can say little, as he has not talked to me on the 

subject; but I know that he has never had intercourse with women, 

and has always had a natural and instinctive repulsion to the 

idea. In all these, I imagine, the physical impulse of sex is 

less imperative than in the average man. The emotional impulse, 

on the other hand, is very strong. It has given birth to 

friendships of which I find no adequate description anywhere but 

in the dialogues of Plato; and, beyond a certain feeling of 

strangeness at the gradual discovery of a temperament apparently 


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