Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and of no great importance but more accessible to therapeutic measures. 

Three years later, Krafft-Ebing, toward the close of his life, adopted the 

same conception; the cases to which he applied it were all, he considered, 

of bisexual disposition and usually, also, marked by sexual hyperesthesia. 

This way of looking at the matter was speedily championed by Naecke and may 

now be said to be widely accepted.[132] 

 

Moll, earlier than Thoinot, had pointed out that it is difficult to 

believe that homosexuality in late life can ever be produced without at 

least some inborn weakness of the heterosexual impulse, and that we must 

not deny the possibility of heredity even when homosexuality appears at 

the age of 50 or 60.[133] 

 

Moll believes it is very doubtful whether heterosexual satiety 

alone can ever suffice to produce homosexuality. Naecke was 

careful to set aside the cases, to which much significance was 

once attached, in which old men with failing sexual powers, or 

younger men exhausted by heterosexual debauchery, are attracted 

to boys. In such cases, which include the majority of those 

appearing late, Naecke regarded the inversion as merely spurious, 

the _faute de mieux_ of persons no longer apt for normal sexual 

activity. 

 

Such cases no doubt need more careful psychological study than 

they usually receive. Fere once investigated a case of this kind 

in which a healthy young man (though with slightly neurotic 

heredity on one side) practised sexual intercourse excessively 

between the ages of 20 and 23--often impelled more by _amour 

propre_ (or what Adler would term the "masculine protest" of the 

organically inferior) than sexual desire--and then suddenly 

became impotent, at the same time losing all desire, but without 

any other loss of health. Six months later potency slowly 

returned, though never to the same extent, and he married. At the 

age of 35 symptoms of locomotor ataxia began to appear, and some 

years later he again became impotent, but without losing sexual 

desire. Suddenly one day, on sitting in close contact with a 

young man at a _table d'hote_, he experienced a violent erection; 

he afterward found that the same thing occurred with other young 

men, and, though he had no psychic desire for men, he was 

constrained to seek such contact, and a repugnance for women and 

their sexuality arose. Five months later a complete paraplegic 

impotence set in; and then both the homosexual tendency and the 

aversion to women disappeared. (Fere, _L'Instinct Sexuel_, p. 

184.) In such a case, under the influence of disease, excessive 

stimulation seems to result in more or less complete sexual 

anesthesia, just as temporarily we may be more or less blinded by 

excess of light; and functional power reasserts itself under the 

influence of a different and normally much weaker stimulus. 

 

Leppmann, who has studied the homosexual manifestations of 

previously normal old men toward boys ("Greisenalter und 

Kriminalitaet," _Zeitschrift fuer Psychotherapie_, Bd. i, Heft 4, 

1909), considers the chief factor to be a flaring up of the 

sexual impulse in a perverted direction in an early stage of 

morbid cerebral disturbance, not amounting to insanity and not 

involving complete irresponsibility. In such cases, Leppmann 

believes, the subject may, through his lack of power, be brought 

back to the beginning of his sexual life and to the perhaps 

unconsciously homosexual attractions of that age. 

 

With the recognition that homosexuality in youth may be due to an as yet 

undifferentiated sexual impulse, homosexuality in mature age to a retarded 

development on a congenital basis, and homosexuality in sold age to a 

return to the attitude of youth, the area of spurious or "pseudo" 

homosexuality seems to me to be very much restricted. Most, perhaps all, 

authorities still accept the reality of this spurious homosexuality in 

heterosexual persons. But they enter into no details concerning it, and 

they bring forward no minutely observed cases in which it occurred. 

Hirschfeld, in discussing the diagnosis of homosexuality and seeking to 


Page 3 from 4:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   Forward