Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

If, indeed, we really accept the very reasonable view, that the basis of 

the sexual life is bisexual, although its direction may be definitely 

fixed in a heterosexual or homosexual direction at a very early period in 

life, it becomes difficult to see how we can any longer speak with 

certainty of a definitely spurious class of homosexual persons. Everyone 

of Hirschfeld's three classes may well contain a majority of genuinely 

homosexual or bisexual persons. The prostitutes and even the blackmailers 

are certainly genuine inverts in very many cases. Those persons, again, 

who allow themselves to be the recipients of homosexual attentions may 

well possess traces of homosexual feeling, and are undoubtedly in very 

many cases lacking in vigorous heterosexual impulse. Finally, the persons 

who turn to their own sex when forcibly excluded from the society of the 

opposite sex, can by no means be assumed, without question, to be normal 

heterosexual persons. It is only a small proportion of heterosexual 

persons who experience these impulses under such conditions. There are 

always others who under the same conditions remain emotionally attracted 

to the opposite sex and sexually indifferent to their own sex. There is 

evidently a difference, and that difference may most reasonably be 

supposed to be in the existence of a trace of homosexual feeling which is 

called into activity under the abnormal conditions, and subsides when the 

stronger heterosexual impulse can again be gratified. 

 

The real distinction would seem, therefore, to be between a homosexual 

impulse so strong that it subsists even in the presence of the 

heterosexual object, and a homosexual impulse so weak that it is eclipsed 

by the presence of the heterosexual object. We could not, however, 

properly speak of the latter as any more "spurious" or "pseudo" than the 

former. A heterosexual person who experiences a homosexual impulse in the 

absence of any homosexual disposition is not today easy to accept. We can 

certainly accept the possibility of a mechanical or other non-sexual 

stimulus leading to a sexual act contrary to the individual's disposition. 

But usually it is somewhat difficult to prove, and when proved it has 

little psychological significance or importance. We may expect, therefore, 

to find "pseudo-homosexuality," or spurious homosexuality, playing a 

dwindling part in classification. 

 

The simplest of all possible classifications, and that which I adopted in 

the earlier editions of the present _Study_, merely seeks to distinguish 

between those who, not being exclusively attracted to the opposite sex, 

are exclusively attracted to the same sex, and those who are attracted to 

both sexes. The first are the homosexual, whether or not the attraction 

springs from genuine inversion. The second are the bisexual, or, as they 

were formerly more often termed, following Krafft-Ebing, psycho-sexual 

hermaphrodites.[135] There would thus seem to be a broad and simple 

grouping of all sexually functioning persons into three comprehensive 

divisions: the heterosexual, the bisexual, and the homosexual. 

 

Even this elementary classification seems however of no great practical 

use. The bisexual group is found to introduce uncertainty and doubt. Not 

only a large proportion of persons who may fairly be considered normally 

heterosexual have at some time in their lives experienced a feeling which 

may be termed sexual toward individuals of their own sex, but a very large 

proportion of persons who are definitely and markedly homosexual are found 

to have experienced sexual attraction toward, and have had relationships 

with, persons of the opposite sex. The social pressure, urging all persons 

into the normal sexual channel, suffices to develop such slight germs of 

heterosexuality as homosexual persons may possess, and so to render them 

bisexual. In the majority of adult bisexual persons it would seem that the 

homosexual tendency is stronger and more organic than the heterosexual 

tendency. Bisexuality would thus in a large number of cases be comparable 

to ambidexterity, which Biervliet has found to occur most usually in 

people who are organically left-handed.[136] While therefore the division 

into heterosexual, bisexual, and homosexual is a useful superficial 


Page 1 from 4: [1]  2   3   4   Forward