Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

often been able to verify this influence, which would in any case 

seem to be fairly obvious. 

 

Psycho-analysis is, in theory, an ideal method of exploring many 

psychic conditions, such as hysteria and obsessions, which are 

obscure and largely concealed beneath the psychic surface. In 

most homosexual cases the main facts are, with the patient's 

good-will and the investigator's tact, not difficult to 

ascertain. Any difficulties which psychoanalysis may help to 

elucidate mainly concern the early history of the case in 

childhood, and, regarding these, psychoanalysis may sometimes 

raise questions which it cannot definitely settle. 

Psycho-analysis reveals an immense mass of small details, any of 

which may or may not possess significance, and in determining 

which are significant the individuality of the psychoanalyst 

cannot fail to come into play. He will necessarily tend to 

arrange them according to a system. If, for instance, he regards 

infantile incestuous emotions or early Narcissism as an essential 

feature of the mechanism of homosexuality, a conscientious 

investigator will not rest until he has discovered traces of 

them, as he very probably will. (See, e.g., Sadger, "Fragment der 

Psychoanalyse eines Homosexuellen," _Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle 

Zwischenstufen_, Bd. ix, 1908; and cf. Hirschfeld, _Die 

Homosexualitaet_, p. 164). But the exact weight and significance 

of these traces may still be doubtful, and, even if considerable 

in one case, may be inconsiderable in another. Freud, who sets 

forth one type of homosexual mechanism, admits that there may be 

others. Moreover, it must be added that the psychoanalytic method 

by no means excludes unconscious deception by the subject, as 

Freud found, and so was compelled to admit the patient's tendency 

to "fantasy," as Adler has to "fictions," as a fundamental 

psychic tendency of the "unconscious." 

 

The force of these considerations is now beginning to be 

generally recognized. Thus Moll (art. "Homosexualitaet," in 4th 

ed. of Eulenburg's _Realencyclopaedie der gesamten Heilkunde_, 

1909, p. 611) rightly says that while the invert may occasionally 

embroider his story, "the expert can usually distinguish between 

the truth and the poetry, though it is unnecessary to add that 

complete confidence on the patient's part is necessary," Naecke, 

again (_Sexual-Probleme_, September, 1911, p. 619), after quoting 

with approval the remark of one of the chief German authorities, 

Dr. Numa Praetorius, that "a great number of inverts' histories 

are at the least as trustworthy as the attempts of 

psychoanalysts, especially when they come from persons skillful 

in self-analysis," adds that "even Freudian analysis gives no 

absolute guarantee for truth. A healthy skepticism is 

justifiable--but not an unhealthy skepticism!" Hirschfeld, also 

(_Die Homosexualitaet_, p. 164), whose knowledge of such histories 

is unrivalled, remarks that while we may now and then meet with a 

case of _pseudo-logia fantastica_ in connection with psychic 

debility on the basis of a psychopathic constitution, "taken all 

in all any generalized assertion of the falsehood of inverts is 

an empty fiction, and is merely a sign that the physicians who 

make it have not been able to win the trust of the men and women 

who consult them." My own experience has fully convinced me of 

the truth of this, statement. I am assured that many of the 

inverts I have met not only possess a rare power of intellectual 

self-analysis (stimulated by the constant and inevitable contrast 

between their own feelings and those of the world around them), 

but an unsparing sincerity in that self-analysis not so very 

often attained by normal people. 

 

The histories which follow have been obtained in various ways, 

and are of varying degrees of value. Some are of persons whom I 

have known very well for very long periods, and concerning whom I 

can speak very positively. A few are from complete strangers 

whose good faith, however, I judge from internal evidence that I 


Page 3 from 4:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   Forward