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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

"So far my details are purely innocent. Up to 18, familiarities 

passed at intervals between me and the son of the village doctor, 

a youth about two years older than myself, and precociously 

immoral. I did not really care for him much, but he was my chief 

companion. Then I became a school-assistant, and for about six 

years managed to control myself, only, alas, to fall again. 

Another resolution I kept for eight years, one long fight with my 

nature. Again I sinned in three instances, extending over three 

or four years. I now come to a very painful and eventful episode 

in my unhappy life which I would gladly pass over were it 

possible. It was a case, in middle life, of sin, discovery, and 

great folly in addition. 

 

"Before going into details, so far as may be necessary, I cannot 

help asking you to consider calmly and dispassionately my exact 

condition compared with that of my fellow-creatures as a whole. 

In my struggles to resist in the past, I have at times felt as if 

wrestling in the folds of a python. I again sinned, then, with a 

youth and his friend. Oddly enough, discovery followed through a 

man who was actuated by a feeling of revenge for a strictly right 

act on my part. The lads refused to state more than the truth, 

and this did not satisfy the man, and a _third_ lad was 

introduced, who was prepared to say anything. This was not all; 

some twelve or fifteen more boys made similar accusations! The 

general belief, in consequence, was that I had committed 

'nameless' crimes in all directions, _ad lib_. If you were to ask 

me for an explanation of the action of all these boys beyond the 

_third_, who, of course, had some special inducements, I can 

offer none. They may have thought that the original trio were 

regarded rather in the light of _heroes_; why should _they_ not 

be heroes, too? 

 

"I might well feel crushed under such a load of accusations, but 

that does not excuse the incredible folly of my conduct. I denied 

alike the modicum of truth and the mass of lying, and went off to 

America. However, as time passed on and my mind got into a proper 

state, I felt that the truth must be told some time or other. I 

accordingly wrote from America to the proper quarter a full 

confession of my sin with regard to the two youths who had told 

merely the truth, at the same time pointing out the falsehood of 

all the rest of the accusations. 

 

"I remained in America six years, and actually made money, so 

that I could return to England with a small capital. I was also 

under a promise to my three sisters (all older than myself) that 

I would return in their lifetime. My programme was to purchase a 

small, light business in London, and quietly earn my living; at 

the same time making my presence known to no one. I _did_ buy 

such a business, got swindled in the most clever way, and lost 

every farthing I possessed in the world! I had to make my plight 

known to old friends who all either gave or lent me money. Still 

my position was a very precarious one. I tried an insurance 

agency, one of the last resources of the educated destitute, but 

soon found out that I was unfitted for work in which _impudence_ 

is a prime factor. Then an extraordinary stroke of good fortune 

took place; almost simultaneously I began to get a few music 

pupils, and literary work in connection with a good musical 

journal. 

 

"Making my presence known to old friends involved the same 

information to those who were _not_ friends. My identity as a 

journalist became known, and as time passed by it seemed to me as 

if half the world had heard of my alleged iniquities. People who 

have never set eyes on me seem to regard me in the light of a 

monster of iniquity who ought not to be suffered to exist. All 

these outsiders believe that I have committed 'nameless' offenses 

times innumerable and lift up their hands in speechless horror at 

the audacity of a man who, so situated, dares to appear openly in 

public, under his own name, and look people in the face. They 


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