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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

"Male Greek statuary and the _Phoedrus_ of Plato have had a 

great, though only confirmatory, influence on my feelings. My 

ideal is that of Theocritus XIII, wherein Hercules was bringing 

Hylas to the perfect measure of a man. My first thought is the 

good of my friend, but, except for the good subjective influence 

of passion, I have failed utterly. 

 

"I am very tall, dark, rather strong, fond of games, though I do 

not excel, owing to short sight. I am English, though I have 

French blood, which may account for an unreservedly passionate 

disposition. Though unlike other people, I am not in the least 

feminine, nor has anyone thought so to my knowledge. I can 

whistle easily and well. I am so masculine that I cannot even 

conceive of passive sexual pleasure in women, much less in men. 

(That is one of the difficulties in boy-love.) My affections are 

inextricably bound up in the ideals of protection of one weaker 

than myself. In the earlier days, when sexuality was less 

conscious, this was a great source of romantic feeling, the 

glamour of which is rather departing. I cannot understand love of 

adult males, much less if they are of lower class, and the idea 

of prostitution is nauseous to me. 

 

"I think I may say that I have the esthetic and moral sense very 

strongly ingrained. Indeed, they are largely synonymous with me. 

I have no dramatic aptitude, and, though I flatter myself that my 

taste is good in music, I have no knowledge of music. If I have a 

favorite color, it is a dark crimson or blue, of the nature of 

old stained glass. I derive great pleasure from all literary and 

pictorial art and architecture; indeed, art of all kinds. I have 

facility in writing personal lyrical verse; it affords me relief. 

 

"I think my inversion must be congenital, as the desire of 

contact with those boys I loved began before masturbation and has 

lasted through private and public resorts and into university 

life. The other sex does not attract me, but I am very fond of 

children, girls as well as boys. (If there is sexuality in this, 

which I trust there is not, it is latent)." 

 

This statement is of interest because it may well lead us to 

suppose that the writer, who is of balanced mind and sound 

judgment, possesses a confirmed homosexual outlook on life. 

While, however, it is the rule for the permanent direction of the 

sexual impulse to be decided by the age of 20, that age is too 

early to permit us to speak positively, especially in a youth 

whose adolescent undifferentiated or homosexual impulses are 

fostered by university life. This proved to be! the case with 

T.D., who, though doubtless possessing a psychically anomalous 

strain, is yet predominantly masculine. On leaving the university 

his heterosexuality asserted itself normally. About six years 

after the earlier statement, he wrote that he had fallen in love. 

"I am on the eve of marrying a girl of nearly my own age. She has 

sympathy as well as knowledge in my fields of study; it was thus 

easier for me to explain my past, and I found that she could not 

understand the moral objections to homosexual practices. My own 

opinion always was that the moral objections were very 

considerable, but might in some cases be overcome. In any case I 

have entirely lost my sexual attraction toward boys; though I am 

glad to say that the appreciation of their charm and grace 

remains. My instincts, therefore, have undergone a considerable 

change, but the change is not entirely in the direction of 

normality. The instinct for sodomy in the proper sense of the 

word used to be unintelligible to me; since the object of 

attraction has become a woman this instinct is mixed with the 

normal in my desire. Further, an element which much troubled me, 

as being most foreign to my ideal feelings, has not quite left 

me--the indecent and often scatologic curiosity about immature 

girls. I can only hope that the realization of the normal in 

marriage may finally kill these painful aberrations. I should add 


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