Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the difference between himself and normal human beings. No 

pleasure he has enjoyed, he declares, can equal a thousandth 

part of the pain caused by the internal consciousness of 

pariahdom. The utmost he can plead in his own defense, he admits, 

is irresponsibility, for he acknowledges that his impulse may be 

morbid. But he feels absolutely certain that in early life his 

health was ruined and his moral repose destroyed owing to the 

perpetual conflict with his own inborn nature, and that relief 

and strength came with indulgence. Although he always has before 

him the terror of discovery, he is convinced that his sexual 

dealings with men have been thoroughly wholesome to himself, 

largely increasing his physical, moral, and intellectual energy, 

and not injurious to others. He has no sense whatever of moral 

wrong in his actions, and he regards the attitude of society 

toward those in his position as utterly unjust and founded on 

false principles. 

 

The next case is, like the foregoing, that of a successful man of letters 

who also passed through a long period of mental conflict before he became 

reconciled to his homosexual instincts. He belongs to a family who are all 

healthy and have shown marked ability in different intellectual 

departments. He feels certain that one of his brothers is as absolute an 

invert as himself and that another is attracted to both sexes. I am 

indebted to him for the following detailed narrative, describing his 

emotions and experiences in childhood, which I regard as of very great 

interest, not only as a contribution to the psychology of inversion, but 

to the embryology of the sexual emotions generally. We here see described, 

in an unduly precocious and hyperesthetic form, ideas and feelings which, 

in a slighter and more fragmentary shape, may be paralleled in the early 

experiences of many normal men and women. But it must be rare to find so 

many points in sexual psychology so definitely illustrated in a single 

child. It may be added that the narrative is also not without interest as 

a study in the evolution of a man of letters; a child whose imagination 

was thus early exercised and developed was predestined for a literary 

career. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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