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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

HISTORY XXV.--A.S. Schoolmaster, aged 46. 

 

"My father was, I should say, below the average in capacity for 

friendship. He liked young girls, and was never interested in 

boys. He was a man of strongly Puritanical morality, capable of 

condemning with gloomy bitterness. He was also a man capable of 

great sacrifice for principle, and mentally very well endowed. My 

mother was a clever, practical woman, with wide sympathies. She 

was capable of warm friendship, especially toward those younger 

than herself. Her father (whom I never saw) was a teacher. He was 

devoted to his wife, but also delighted in the company of young 

men. He had always some young man on his arm, my mother would 

tell me. My mother's family is of Welsh descent. I learned to 

read at 5, and I can scarcely have been more than 6 when I used 

to read again and again David's lament for Absalom. Even now I 

can dimly recall the siren charm for me of that melancholy 

refrain, 'O my son Absalom.... O Absalom, my son, my son!' Of 

late, when I have thought of the amount of devotion I have shown 

to lads, and the amount I have sometimes suffered for them, I 

have felt as if there were something almost weirdly prophetic in 

that early incident. 

 

"I was always an impressionable creature. My mother was very 

musical, and her singing 'got hold' of me wonderfully. The 

dramatic and the poetic always strongly appealed to me. 

 

"I felt I should like to act; but I never dared. In the same way 

I felt that one day I should like to be a schoolmaster, but I 

dared not say so. A shy, retiring creature was obviously unfitted 

for such occupations. Well, the teaching came about, and the 

strange part was that the boys were somehow or other attracted 

by me, and the 'worst' customers were attracted most. And there 

came a chance of acting too. Owing to some difficulties about the 

cast in a play at school, I took a part. After that I _knew_ that 

(within a certain range) I could act. I spent two holidays with a 

dramatic company. I should undoubtedly have remained on the 

stage, but for one thing. I don't wish to be sanctimonious, but 

dirty and ugly jokes are odious to me. It was this sort of thing 

that drove me away. I threw myself into the school work instead. 

 

"It was partly the dramatic interest, partly a quite genuine 

interest in human nature, that led me to do some preaching too. 

When I had been badly hurt by one or two youngsters whom I loved, 

I thought of going in for pastoral work, but this too was given 

up--and very wisely. I should never be able to work comfortably 

with any organization. For one thing I have a way of taking on 

new ideas, and organizations do not like that. For another, all 

social functions are anathema to me. 

 

"Interest in 'art' as usually understood began to be marked only 

after I was 30. It started with architecture and passed on to 

painting and sculpture. The tendency to do rather a variety (too 

great a variety) of things characterizes many uranians. We are 

rather like the labile chemical compounds: our molecules readily 

rearrange themselves. 

 

"As a boy of 10 I had the ordinary sweethearting with a girl of 

the same age. The incident is worth perhaps a little further 

comment for the following reason: When I was 16 years old the 

girl lived with us for a year. She was a nice, pleasant, bright 

girl, and she thought a great deal of me. I was strongly 

attracted by her. I remember especially one little incident. I 

had been showing her how to do some algebra and she was kneeling 

at the table by the side of my chair. Her hair was flowing over 

her shoulders and she looked rather charming. She expressed warm 

admiration of the way I had worked the problem out. I remember 

that I deliberately squashed out the feeling of attraction that 

came over me. I scarcely know why I did this; but I fancy there 

was a vague sense that I did not want my work disturbed. There 

was no sexual attraction or, at least, none that was manifest. 

The girl, there is no doubt, grew to love me. I am sorry to say 


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