Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

HISTORY XXVI.--On the twenty-eighth of March, 1894, at noon, in 

the open street in Chicago, Guy T. Olmstead fired a revolver at a 

letter-carrier named William L. Clifford. He came up from behind, 

and deliberately fired four shots, the first entering Clifford's 

loins, the other three penetrating the back of his head, so that 

the man fell and was supposed to be fatally wounded. Olmstead 

made little attempt to escape, as a crowd rushed up with the 

usual cry of "Lynch him!" but waved his revolver, exclaiming: 

"I'll never be taken alive!" and when a police-officer disarmed 

him: "Don't take my gun; let me finish what I have to do." This 

was evidently an allusion, as will be seen later on, to an 

intention to destroy himself. He eagerly entered the prison-van, 

however, to escape the threatening mob. 

 

Olmstead, who was 30 years of age, was born near Danville, Ill., 

in which city he lived for many years. Both parents were born in 

Illinois. His father, some twenty years ago, shot and nearly 

killed a wealthy coal operator, induced to commit the crime, it 

is said, by a secret organization of a hundred prominent citizens 

to whom the victim had made himself obnoxious by bringing suits 

against them for trivial causes. The victim became insane, but 

the criminal was never punished, and died a few years later at 

the age of 44. This man had another son who was considered 

peculiar. 

 

Guy Olmstead began to show signs of sexual perversity at the age 

of 12. He was seduced (we are led to believe) by a man who 

occupied the same bedroom. Olmstead's early history is not clear 

from the data to hand. It appears that he began his career as a 

schoolteacher in Connecticut, and that he there married the 

daughter of a prosperous farmer; but shortly after he "fell in 

love" with her male cousin, whom he describes as a very handsome 

young man. This led to a separation from his wife, and he went 

West. 

 

He was never considered perfectly sane, and from October, 1886, 

to May, 1889 he was in the Kankakee Insane Asylum. His illness 

was reported as of three years' duration, and caused by general 

ill-health; heredity doubtful, habits good, occupation that of a 

schoolteacher. His condition was diagnosed as paranoia. On 

admission he was irritable, alternately excited and depressed. He 

returned home in good condition. 

 

At this period, and again when examined later, Olmstead's 

physical condition is described as, on the whole, normal and 

fairly good. Height, 5 feet 8 inches; weight, 159 pounds. Special 

senses normal; genitals abnormally small, with rudimentary penis. 

His head is asymmetrical, and is full at the occiput, slightly 

sunken at the bregma, and the forehead is low. His cephalic index 

is 78. The hair is sandy, and normal in amount over head, face, 

and body. His eyes are gray, small, and deeply set; the zygomae 

are normal. The nose is large and very thin. There is arrested 

development of upper jaw. The ears are excessively developed and 

malformed. The face is very much lined, the nasolabial fissure is 

deeply cut, and there are well-marked horizontal wrinkles on the 

forehead, so that he looks at least ten years older than his 

actual age. The upper jaw is of partial V-shape, the lower well 

developed. The teeth and their tubercles and the alveolar process 

are normal. The breasts are full. The body is generally well 

developed; the hands and feet are large. 

 

Olmstead's history is defective for some years after he left 

Kankakee. In October, 1892, we hear of him as a letter-carrier in 

Chicago. During the following summer he developed a passion for 

William Clifford, a fellow letter-carrier about his own age, also 

previously a schoolteacher, and regarded as one of the most 

reliable and efficient men in the service. For a time Clifford 

seems to have shared this passion, or to have submitted to it, 

but he quickly ended the relationship and urged his friend to 

undergo medical treatment, offering to pay the expenses himself. 

Olmstead continued to write letters of the most passionate 


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