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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

description to Clifford, and followed him about constantly until 

the latter's life was made miserable. In December, 1893, Clifford 

placed the letters in the postmaster's hands, and Olmstead was 

requested to resign at once. Olmstead complained to the Civil 

Service Commission at Washington that he had been dismissed 

without cause, and also applied for reinstatement, but without 

success. 

 

In the meanwhile, apparently on the advice of friends, he went 

into hospital, and in the middle of February, 1894, his testicles 

were removed. No report from the hospital is to hand. The effect 

of removing the testicles was far from beneficial, and he began 

to suffer from hysterical melancholia. A little later he went 

into hospital again. On March 19th he wrote to Dr. Talbot from 

the Mercy Hospital, Chicago: "I returned to Chicago last 

Wednesday night, but felt so miserable I concluded to enter a 

hospital again, and so came to Mercy, which is very good as 

hospitals go. But I might as well go to Hades as far as any hope 

of my getting well is concerned. I am utterly incorrigible, 

utterly incurable, and utterly impossible. At home I thought for 

a time that I was cured, but I was mistaken, and after seeing 

Clifford last Thursday I have grown worse than ever so far as my 

passion for him is concerned. Heaven, only knows how hard I have 

tried to make a decent creature out of myself, but my vileness is 

uncontrollable, and I might as well give up and die. I wonder if 

the doctors knew that after emasculation it was possible for a 

man to have erections, commit masturbation, and have the same 

passion as before. I am ashamed of myself; I hate myself; but I 

can't help it. I have friends among nice people, play the piano, 

love music, books, and everything that is beautiful and 

elevating; yet they can't elevate me, because this load of inborn 

vileness drags me down and prevents my perfect enjoyment of 

anything. Doctors are the only ones who understand and know my 

helplessness before this monster. I think and work till my brain 

whirls, and I can scarce refrain from crying out my troubles." 

This letter was written a few days before the crime was 

committed. 

 

When conveyed to the police station Olmstead completely broke 

down and wept bitterly, crying: "Oh! Will, Will, come to me! Why 

don't you kill me and let me go to him!" (At this time he 

supposed he had killed Clifford.) A letter was found on him, as 

follows: "Mercy, March 27th. To Him Who Cares to Read: Fearing 

that my motives in killing Clifford and myself may be 

misunderstood, I write this to explain the cause of this homicide 

and suicide. Last summer Clifford and I began a friendship which 

developed into love." He then recited the details of the 

friendship, and continued: "After playing a Liszt rhapsody for 

Clifford over and over, he said that when our time to die came he 

hoped we would die together, listening to such glorious music as 

that. Our time has now come to die, but death will not be 

accompanied by music. Clifford's love has, alas! turned to deadly 

hatred. For some reason Clifford suddenly ended our relations and 

friendship." In his cell he behaved in a wildly excited manner, 

and made several attempts at suicide; so that he had to be 

closely watched. A few weeks later he wrote to Dr. Talbot: "Cook 

County Gaol, April 23. I feel as though I had neglected you in 

not writing you in all this time, though you may not care to hear 

from me, as I have never done anything but trespass on your 

kindness. But please do me the justice of thinking that I never 

expected all this trouble, as I thought Will and I would be in 

our graves and at peace long before this. But my plans failed 

miserably. Poor Will was not dead, and I was grabbed before I 

could shoot myself. I think Will really shot himself, and I feel 

certain others will think so, too, when the whole story comes out 

in court. I can't understand the surprise and indignation my act 

seemed to engender, as it was perfectly right and natural that 


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