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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

After the first year at college, Edmund transferred to another 

school farther away from M.O. and the opportunities for meeting 

became rarer, but their affection was maintained and the 

intercourse resumed whenever it was possible. Gradually, however, 

Edmund became interested in women and finally married. M.O. also 

formed relations repeatedly with college friends and occasionally 

with others. 

 

On the whole M.O. preferred boys a year or two younger than 

himself, but as he grew older the age difference increased. At 30 

he regarded himself as virtually "engaged" to a youth of 17, one 

unusually mature, however, and much larger than himself. 

 

M.O. is always unhappy unless his affections have fairly free 

course. Life has been very disappointing to him in other 

respects. His greatest joys have come to him in this way. If he 

is able to consummate his present plan of union with the youth 

just referred to, he will feel that his life has been crowned by 

what is for him the best possible end; otherwise, he declares, he 

would not care to live at all. 

 

He admires male beauty passionately. Feminine beauty he perceives 

objectively, as he would any design of flowing curves and 

delicate coloring, but it has no sexual charm for him whatever. 

Women have put themselves in his way repeatedly, but he finds 

himself more and more irritated by their specifically feminine 

foibles. With men generally he is much more patient and 

sympathetic. 

 

The first literature that appealed to him was Plato's dialogues, 

first read at 20 years of age. Until then he had not known but 

what he stood alone in his peculiarity. He read what he could of 

classic literature. He enjoys Pater, appreciating his attitude 

toward his own sex. Four or five years, later he came across 

Raffalovich's book, and ever since has felt a real debt of 

gratitude to its author. 

 

M.O. has no wish to injure society at large. As an individual he 

holds that he has the same right to be himself that anyone else 

has. He thinks that while boys of from 13 to 15 might possibly be 

rendered inverts, those who reach 16 without it cannot be bent 

that way. They may be devoted to an invert enough in other ways 

to yield him what he wishes sexually, but they will remain 

essentially normal themselves. His observations are based on 

about 30 homosexual relationships that have lasted various 

lengths of time. 

 

M.O. feels strongly the poetic and elevated character of his 

principal homosexual relationships, but he shrinks from appearing 

too sentimental. 

 

With regard to the traces of feminism in inverts he writes:-- 

 

"Up to the age of 11 I associated much with a cousin five years 

older (the one referred to above) and took great delight in a 

game we often played, in which I was a girl,--a never-ending 

romance, a non-sexual love story. 

 

"Somewhat later and until puberty, I took great delight in 

acting, but generally took female roles, wearing skirts, shawls, 

beads, wigs, head-dresses. When I was about 13 my family began to 

make fun of me for it. I played secretly for a while, and then 

the desire for it left, never to return. 

 

"There still lingers, however, a minor interest, which began 

before puberty, in valentines. My feeling for them is much like 

my feeling for flowers. 

 

"Before I reached puberty I was sometimes called a 'sissy' by my 

father. Such taunts humiliated me more than anything else has 

ever done. After puberty my father no longer applied the term, 

and gradually other persons ceased to tease me that way. The 

sting of it lasted, though, and led me more than once to ask 

intimate friends, both men and women, if they considered me at 

all feminine. Every one of them has been very emphatically of the 

opinion that my rational life is distinctively masculine, being 

logical, impartial, skeptical. One or two have suggested that I 

have a finer discrimination than most men, and that I take care 

of my rooms somewhat as a woman might, though this does not 

extend to the style of decorations. One man said that I lacked 


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