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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

only of precocious nervous and sexual irritability, greatly 

heightened and directed by the secret practices of the children 

with whom he associated. He does not see why these experiences 

should have given him a homosexual bent any more than a 

heterosexual one. 

 

The psychoanalysis recalled to M.O. that during the period of 

early flirtation he had often kissed and embraced various girls, 

but likewise he recalled having observed at the same time, with 

some surprise, that no definitely sexual desire arose, though the 

way was probably open to gratify it. Such interest as did exist 

ceased wholly or almost so as the relation with Edmund developed. 

There was no aversion from the company of girls and women, 

however; the intellectual friendships were mainly with them, 

while the emotional ones were with boys. 

 

Very recently M.O. spent several days with Edmund, who has been 

married for several years. With absolutely no sexual interest in 

each other, they nevertheless found a great bond of love still 

subsisting. Neither regrets anything of the past, but feels that 

the final outcome of their earlier relation has been good. 

Edmund's beauty is still pronounced, and is remarked by others. 

 

In spite of his precocious sexuality, M.O. had from the very 

first an extreme disgust for obscene stories, and for any 

association of sexual things with filthy words and anecdotes. 

Owing in part to this and in part to his temperamental 

skepticism, he disbelieved what associates told him regarding 

sexual emissions, only becoming convinced when he actually 

experienced them; and the facts of reproduction he denied 

indignantly until he read them in a medical work. Until he was 

well over 25 the physical aversion from any thought of 

reproduction was intense. He knows other, normal, young men who 

have felt the same way, but he believes it would be prevented or 

overcome by sex-education such as is now being introduced in 

American schools. 

 

Again, as to traces of feminism: Perhaps two years ago, all 

impulse to give the love-bite disappeared suddenly. There has 

been lately a marked increase of dramatic interest, arising in 

perfectly natural ways, and without any of the peculiarities 

noted before. The childish pleasure in valentines has all gone; 

M.O. believes that _circumstances_ have lately been more 

favorable for the development of a more robust estheticism. 

 

For some years he has heard no definite reproach for feminism, 

though some persons tell his friends that he is "very peculiar." 

He forms many intimate, enduring, non-sexual friendships with 

both men and women, and he doubts if the peculiarity noted by 

others is due so much to his homosexuality as it is to his 

estheticism, skepticism, and the unconventional opinions which he 

expresses quite indiscreetly at times. With the improvement in 

general health, has come the changes that would be expected in 

food and other matters of daily life. 

 

Resuming his narrative at the point where the earlier 

communication left it, M.O. says that about a year after that 

time, the youth of 17 to whom he had considered himself virtually 

engaged withdrew from the agreement so far as it bore on his own 

future, but not from the sentimental relation as it existed. 

Although separated most of the time by distance, the physical 

relation was resumed whenever they met. Subsequently, however, 

the young man fell in love with a young woman and became engaged 

to her. His physical relation with M.O. then ceased, but the 

friendship otherwise continues strong. 

 

Shortly after the first break in this relation, M.O. became, 

through the force of quite unusual circumstances, very friendly 

and intimate with a young woman of considerable charm. He 

confided to her his abnormality, and was not repulsed. To others 

their relation probably appeared that of lovers, and a painful 

situation was created by the slander of a jealous woman. M.O. 

felt that in honor he must propose marriage to her. The young 


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