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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

woman was non-committal, but invited M.O. to spend several months 

at her home. Shortly after his arrival a sad occurrence in his 

own family compelled him to go away, and they did not meet again 

for four years. They corresponded, but less and less often. His 

relations with boys continued. 

 

Before his final meeting with her he became acquainted with a 

woman whom he has since married. The acquaintance began in a 

wholly non-sentimental community of interests in certain 

practical affairs, and very gradually widened into an 

intellectual and sympathetic friendship. M.O. had no secrets from 

this woman. After a full and prolonged consideration of all sides 

of the matter they married. Since that event he has had no sexual 

relations except with his wife. With her they are not passionate, 

but they are animated by the strong desire for children. Of the 

parental instinct he had become aware several years before this. 

 

M.O. believes that no moral stigma should be attached to 

homosexuality until it can be proved to result from the vicious 

life of a free moral agent,--and of this he has no expectation. 

He believes that much of its danger and unhappiness would be 

prevented by a thorough yet discreet sex-education, such as 

should be given to all children, whether normal or abnormal. 

 

 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[124] Thus Godard described the little boys in Cairo as amusing themselves 

indifferently either with boys or girls in sexual play. (_Egypte et 

Palestine_, 1867, p. 105.) The same thing may be observed in England and 

elsewhere. 

 

[125] Thus, of the Duc d'Orleans, in the seventeenth century, as described 

in Bouchard's _Confessions_, one of my correspondents writes: "This prince 

was of the same mind as Campanella, who, in the _Citta del Sole_, laid it 

down that young men ought to be freely admitted to women for the avoidance 

of sexual aberrations. Aretino and Berni enable us to comprehend the 

sexual immorality of males congregated together in the courts of Roman 

prelates." The homosexuality of youth was also well recognized among the 

Romans, but they adopted the contrary course and provided means to gratify 

it, as the existence of the _concubinus_, referred to by Catullus, clearly 

shows. 

 

[126] "Our Public Schools: their Methods and Morals." _New Review_, July, 

1893. 

 

[127] Max Dessoir, "Zuer Psychologie der Vita Sexualis," _Allgemeine 

Zeitschrift fuer Psychiatrie_, 1894, H. 5. 

 

[128] F.H.A. Marshall, _The Physiology of Reproduction_, 1910, pp. 650-8. 

 

[129] Iwan Bloch, in _The Sexual Life of Our Time_, makes this distinction 

as between "homosexuality" (corresponding to inversion) and 

"pseudo-homosexuality." According to the terminology I have accepted, the 

term "pseudo-homosexuality" would be unnecessary and incorrect. More 

recently (_Die Prostitution_, Bd. i, 1912, p. 103) Bloch has preferred, in 

place of pseudo-homosexuality, the more satisfactory term, "secondary 

homosexuality." 

 

[130] See, for instance, Hirschfeld's reasonable discussion of the matter, 

_Die Homosexualitaet_, ch. xvii. 

 

[131] Alfred Fuchs, who edited Krafft-Ebing's _Psychopathia Sexualis_ 

after the latter's death, distinguishes between congenital homosexuality, 

manifesting itself from the first without external stimulation, and 

homosexuality on a basis of inborn disposition needing special external 

influences to arouse it (_Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, Bd. iv, 

1902, p. 181). 

 

[132] Krafft-Ebing, "Ueber tardive Homosexualitaet," _Jahrbuch fuer 

sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, Bd. iii, 1901, p. 7; Naecke, "Probleme auf 

den Gebiete der Homosexualitaet," _Allgemeine Zeitschrift fuer 

Psychiatrie_, 1902, p. 805; ib., "Ueber tardive Homosexualitaet," 

_Sexual-Probleme_, September, 1911. Numa Praetorius (_Jahrbuch fuer 

sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, January, 1913, p. 228) considers that 

retarded cases should not be regarded as bisexual, but as genuine 

inverts who had acquired a pseudoheterosexuality which at last falls 

away; at the most, he believes such cases merely represent a 

prolongation of the youthful undifferentiated period. 

 

[133] Moll, _Untersuchungen ueber die Libido Sexualis_, 1897, pp, 458-8. 


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