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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

There have been numerous cases in America more recently. One case 

(for some details concerning which I am indebted to Dr. J.G. 

Kiernan, of Chicago) is that of the "Tiller Sisters," two 

quintroons, who for many years had acted together under that name 

in cheap theaters. One, who was an invert, with a horror of men 

dating from early girlhood, was sexually attached to the other, 

who was without inborn inversion, and was eventually induced by a 

man to leave the invert. The latter, overcome by jealousy, broke 

into the apartment of the couple and shot the man dead. She was 

tried, and sent to prison for life. A defense of insanity was 

made, but for this there was no evidence. In another case, also 

occurring in Chicago (reported in _Medicine_, June, 1899, and 

_Alienist and Neurologist_, October, 1899), a trained nurse lived 

for fourteen years with a young woman who left her on four 

different occasions, but was each time induced to return; 

finally, however, she left and married, whereupon the nurse shot 

the husband, who was not, however, fatally wounded. The culprit 

in this case had been twice married, but had not lived with 

either of her husbands; it was stated that her mother had died in 

an asylum, and that her brother had committed suicide. She was 

charged with disorderly conduct, and subjected to a fine. 

 

In another later case in Chicago a Russian girl of 22, named Anna 

Rubinowitch, shot from motives of jealousy another Russian girl 

to whom she had been devoted from childhood, and then fatally 

shot herself. The relations between the two girls had been very 

intimate. "Our love affair is one purely of the soul," Anna 

Rubinowitch was accustomed to say; "we love each other on a 

higher plane than that of earth." (I am informed that there were 

in fact physical relationships; the sexual organs were normal.) 

This continued, with great devotion on each side, until Anna's 

"sweetheart" began to show herself susceptible to the advances of 

a male wooer. This aroused uncontrollable jealousy in Anna, whose 

father, it may be noted, had committed suicide by shooting some 

years previously. 

 

Homosexual relationships are also a cause of suicide among women. 

Such a case was reported in Massachusetts early in 1901. A girl 

of 21 had been tended during a period of nervous prostration, 

apparently of hysterical nature, by a friend and neighbor, 

fourteen years her senior, married and having children. An 

intimate friendship grew up, equally ardent on both sides. The 

mother of the younger woman and the husband of the other took 

measures to put a stop to the intimacy, and the girl was sent 

away to a distant city; stolen interviews, however, still 

occurred. Finally, when the obstacles became insurmountable, the 

younger woman bought a revolver and deliberately shot herself in 

the temple, in presence of her mother, dying immediately. Though 

sometimes thought to act rather strangely, she was a great 

favorite with all, handsome, very athletic, fond of all outdoor 

sports, an energetic religious worker, possessing a fine voice, 

and was an active member of many clubs and societies. The older 

woman belonged to an aristocratic family and was loved and 

respected by all. In another case in New York in 1905 a retired 

sailor, "Captain John Weed," who had commanded transatlantic 

vessels for many years, was admitted to a Home for old sailors 

and shortly after became ill and despondent, and cut his throat. 

It was then found that "Captain Weed" was really a woman. I am 

informed that the old sailor's despondency and suicide were due 

to enforced separation from a female companion. 

 

The infatuation of young girls for actresses and other prominent 

women may occasionally lead to suicide. Thus in Philadelphia, a 

few years ago, a girl of 19, belonging to a very wealthy family, 

beautiful and highly educated, acquired an absorbing infatuation 

for Miss Mary Garden, the _prima donna_, with whom she had no 

personal acquaintance. The young girl would kneel in worship 

before the singer's portrait, and studied hairdressing and 


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