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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

deprived of sexual satisfaction.[151] 

 

Among the Arab women, according to Kocher, homosexual practices are rare, 

though very common among Arab men. In Egypt, however, according to Godard, 

Kocher, and others, it is almost fashionable, and every woman in the harem 

has a "friend." In Turkey homosexuality is sometimes said to be rare among 

women. But it would appear to be found in the harems and women's baths of 

Turkey, as well as of Islam generally. Brantome in the sixteenth century 

referred to the Lesbianism of Turkish women at the baths, and Leo 

Africanus in the same century mentioned the tribadism of Moorish women and 

the formal organization of tribadic prostitution in Fez. There was an 

Osmanli Sapphic poetess, Mihiri, whose grave is at Amasia, and Vambery and 

Achestorides agree as to the prevalence of feminine homosexuality in 

Turkey.[152] Among the negroes and mulattoes of French creole countries, 

according to Corre, homosexuality is very common. "I know a lady of great 

beauty," he remarks, "a stranger in Guadalupe and the mother of a family, 

who is obliged to stay away from the markets and certain shops because of 

the excessive admiration of mulatto women and negresses, and the impudent 

invitations which they dare to address to her."[153] He refers to several 

cases of more or less violent sexual attempts by women on young colored 

girls of 12 or 14, and observes that such attempts by men on children of 

their own sex are much rarer. 

 

In China (according to Matignon) and in Cochin China (according to 

Lorion) homosexuality does not appear to be common among women. In India, 

however, it is probably as prevalent among women as it certainly is among 

men. 

 

 

 

In the first edition of this Study I quoted the opinion of Dr. 

Buchanan, then Superintendant of the Central Gaol of Bengal at 

Bhagalpur, who informed me that he had never come across a case 

and that his head-gaoler had never heard of such a thing in 

twenty-five years' experience. Another officer in the Indian 

Medical Service assures me, however, that there cannot be the 

least doubt as to the frequency of homosexuality among women in 

India, either inside or outside gaols. I am indebted to him for 

the following notes on this point:-- 

 

"That homosexual relationships are common enough among Indian 

women is evidenced by the fact that the Hindustani language has 

five words to denote the tribade: (1) _dugana_, (2) _zanakhe_, 

(3) _sa'tar_, (4) _chapathai_, and (5) _chapatbaz_. The _modus 

operandi_ is generally what Martial calls _geminos committere 

cunnos_, but sometimes a phallus, called _saburah_, is employed. 

The act itself is called _chapat_ or _chapti_, and the Hindustani 

poets, Nazir, Rangin, Jan S'aheb, treat of Lesbian love very 

extensively and sometimes very crudely. Jan S'aheb, a woman poet, 

sings to the effect that intercourse with a woman by means of a 

phallus is to be preferred to the satisfaction offered by a male 

lover. The common euphemism employed when speaking of two 

tribades who live together is that they 'live apart.' So much for 

the literary evidence as to the prevalence of what, _mirable 

dictu_, Dr. Buchanan's gaoler was ignorant of. 

 

"Now for facts. In the gaol of R. the superintendent discovered a 

number of phalli in the females' inclosure; they were made of 

clay and sun-dried and bore marks of use. In the gaol of S. was a 

woman who (as is usual with tribades in India) wore male attire, 

and was well known for her sexual proclivities. An examination 

revealed the following: Face much lined, mammae of masculine type, 

but nipples elongated and readily erectile; gluteal and iliac 

regions quite of masculine type, as also the thighs; clitoris, 

with enlarged glands, readily erectile; nymphae thickened and 

enlarged; vulvar orifice patent, for she had in early youth been 

a prostitute; the voice was almost contralto. Her partner was of 

low type, but eminently feminine in configuration and manner. In 

this case I heard that 'the man' went to a local ascetic and 

begged his intercession with the deity, so that she might 

impregnate her partner. ('The Hindoo medical works mention the 


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