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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

I knew that in relations with others she was spending the 

greatest effort in following a course that I urged on her, and 

was doing what I thought right in spite of the most painful 

pressure on her to do wrong; and that she needed all the support 

and comfort I could give her. It seemed to me, after our 

conversation, that the right path for me lay not in giving way to 

fears and scruples, but in giving my friend straightforwardly all 

the love I could and all the kinds of love I could. I decided to 

keep my eyes open for danger, but meanwhile to go on. 

 

"We were living alone together at the time, and thenceforward we 

did as we liked doing. As soon as we could, we moved to a bed 

where we could sleep together all night. In the day when no one 

was there we sat as close together as we wished, which was very 

close. We kissed each other as often as we wanted to kiss each 

other, which was very many times a day. 

 

"The results of this, so far as I can see, have been wholly good. 

We love each other warmly, but no temptation to nastiness has 

ever come, and I cannot see now that it is at all likely to come. 

With custom, the localized physical excitement has practically 

disappeared, and I am no longer obsessed by imagined embraces. 

The spiritual side of our affection seems to have grown steadily 

stronger and more profitable since the physical side has, been 

allowed to take its natural place." 

 

A class in which homosexuality, while fairly distinct, is only slightly 

marked, is formed by the women to whom the actively inverted woman is most 

attracted. These women differ, in the first place, from the normal, or 

average, woman in that they are not repelled or disgusted by lover-like 

advances from persons of their own sex. They are not usually attractive to 

the average man, though to this rule there are many exceptions. Their 

faces may be plain or ill-made, but not seldom they possess good figures: 

a point which is apt to carry more weight with the inverted woman than 

beauty of face. Their sexual impulses are seldom well marked, but they are 

of strongly affectionate nature. On the whole, they are women who are not 

very robust and well developed, physically or nervously, and who are not 

well adapted for child-bearing, but who still possess many excellent 

qualities, and they are always womanly. One may, perhaps, say that they 

are the pick of the women whom the average man would pass by. No doubt, 

this is often the reason why they are open to homosexual advances, but I 

do not think it is the sole reason. So far as they may be said to 

constitute a class, they seem to possess a genuine, though not precisely 

sexual, preference for women over men, and it is this coldness, rather 

than lack of charm, which often renders men rather indifferent to them. 

 

The actively inverted woman usually differs from the woman of the class 

just mentioned in one fairly essential character: a more or less distinct 

trace of masculinity. She may not be, and frequently is not, what would be 

called a "mannish" woman, for the latter may imitate men on grounds of 

taste and habit unconnected with sexual perversion, while in the inverted 

woman the masculine traits are part of an organic instinct which she by no 

means always wishes to accentuate. The inverted woman's masculine element 

may, in the least degree, consist only in the fact that she makes advances 

to the woman to whom she is attracted and treats all men in a cool, 

direct manner, which may not exclude comradeship, but which excludes every 

sexual relationship, whether of passion or merely of coquetry. Usually the 

inverted woman feels absolute indifference toward men, and not seldom 

repulsion. And this feeling, as a rule, is instinctively reciprocated by 

men. At the same time bisexual women are at least as common as bisexual 

men. 

 


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