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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

profound an impression on the child that she was ridiculed by her 

playmates for preferring to sit in a dark corner on the 

lawn--where she might watch this young lady--rather than to play 

games. Being a sensitive child, after this experience she was 

careful not to reveal her feelings to anyone. She felt 

instinctively that in this she was different from others. Her 

sense of beauty developed early, but there was always an 

indefinable feeling of melancholy associated with it. The 

twilight, a dark night when the stars shone brightly; these had a 

very depressing effect upon her, but possessed a strong 

attraction nevertheless, and pictures appealed to her. At the age 

of 12 she fell in love with a schoolmate, two years older than 

herself, who was absorbed in the boys and never suspected this 

affection; she wept bitterly because they could not be confirmed 

at the same time, but feared to appear undignified and 

sentimental by revealing her feelings. The face of this friend 

reminded her of one of Dolce's Madonnas which she loved. Later 

on, at the age of 16, she loved another friend very dearly and 

devoted herself to her care. There was a tinge of masculinity 

among the women of this friend's family, but it is not clear if 

she can be termed inverted. This was the happiest period of Miss 

M.'s life. Upon the death of this friend, who had long been in 

ill health, eight years afterward, she resolved never to let her 

heart go out to anyone again. 

 

Specific physical gratification plays no part in these 

relationships. The physical sexual feelings began to assert 

themselves at puberty, but not in association with her ideal 

emotions. "In that connection," she writes, "I would have 

considered such things a sacrilege. I fought them and in a 

measure successfully. The practice of self-indulgence which might 

have become a daily habit was only occasional. Her image evoked 

at such times drove away such feelings, for which I felt a 

repugnance, much preferring the romantic ideal feelings. In this 

way, quite unconscious of the fact that I was at all different 

from, any other person, I contrived to train myself to suppress 

or at least to dominate my physical sensations when they arose. 

That is the reason why friendship and love have always seemed 

such holy and beautiful things to me. I have never connected the 

two sets of feelings. I think I am as strongly sexed as anyone, 

but I am able to hold a friend in my arms and experience deep 

comfort and peace without having even a hint of physical sexual 

feeling. Sexual expression may be quite necessary at certain 

times and right under certain conditions, but I am convinced that 

free expression of affection along sentimental channels will do 

much to minimize the necessity for it along specifically sexual 

channels. I have gone three months without the physical outlet. 

The only time I was ever on the verge of nervous prostration was 

after having suppressed the instinct for ten months. The other 

feelings, which I do not consider as sexual feelings at all, so 

fill my life in every department--love, literature, poetry, 

music, professional and philanthropic activities--that I am able 

to let the physical take care of itself. When the physical 

sensations come, it is usually when I am not thinking of a loved 

one at all. I could dissipate them by raising my thought to that 

spiritual friendship. I do not know if this was right and wise. I 

know it is what occurred. It seems a good thing to practise some 

sort of inhibition of the centers and acquire this kind of 

domination. One bad result, however, was that I suffered much at 

times from the physical sensations, and felt horribly depressed 

and wretched whenever they seemed to get the better of me." 

 

"I have been able," she writes, "successfully to master the 

desire for a more perfect and complete expression of my feelings, 

and I have done so without serious detriment to my health." "I 

love few people," she writes again, "but in these instances when 


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