Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

solid human friendship in which there was everything that was 

strong and wholesome on either side, but very little of sex. To 

imagine this in its fullness I had to imagine all social, family, 

and educational conditions vastly different from anything I had 

come across. From this my thoughts ran largely on social matters. 

In whatever direction my thoughts ran I always surveyed them from 

the point of view of a boy. I was trying to wait patiently till I 

could escape from slavery and starvation, and trying to keep the 

open mind I have spoken of, though I never opened a book of 

poetry, or a novel, or a history, but I slipped naturally back 

into my non-girl's attitude and read it through my own eyes. All 

my surface-life was a sham, and only through books, which were 

few, did I ever see the world naturally. A consideration of 

social matters led me to feel very sorry for women, whom I 

regarded as made by a deliberate process of manufacture into the 

fools I thought they were, and by the same process that I myself 

was being made one. I felt more and more that men were to be 

envied and women pitied. I lay stress on this for it started in 

me a deliberate interest in women as women. I began to feel 

protective and kindly toward women and children and to excuse 

women from their responsibility for calamities such as my 

school-career. I never imagined that men required, or would have 

thanked me for, any sort of sympathy. But it came about in these 

ways, and without the least help that I can trace, that by the 

time I was 19 years of age I was keenly interested in all kinds 

of questions: pity for downtrodden women, suffrage questions, 

marriage laws, questions of liberty, freedom of thought, care of 

the poor, views of Nature and Man and God. All these things 

filled my mind to the exclusion of individual men and women. As 

soon as I left school I made a headlong plunge into books where 

these things were treated; I had the answers to everything to 

find after a long period of enforced starvation. I had to work 

for my knowledge. No books or ideas came near me but what I went 

in search of. Another thing that helped me to take an expansive 

view of life at this time was my intense love of Nature. All 

birds and animals affected me by their beauty and grace, and I 

have always kept a profound sympathy with them as well as some 

subtle understanding which enables me to tame them, at times 

remarkably. I not only loved all other creatures, but I believed 

that men and women were the most beautiful things in the universe 

and I would rather look at them (unclothed) than on any other 

thing, as my greatest pleasure. I was prepared to like them 

because they were beautiful. When the time came for me to leave 

school I rather dreaded it, chiefly because I dreaded my life at 

home. I had a great longing at this time to run away and try my 

fortune anywhere; possibly if I had been stronger I might have 

done so. But I was in very poor health through the physical 

crushing I had had, and in very poor spirits through this and my 

mental repression. I still knew myself a prisoner and I was 

bitterly disappointed and ashamed at having no education. I 

afterward had myself taught arithmetic and other things. 

 

"The next period of my life which covered about six years was not 

less important to my development, and was a time of extreme 

misery to me. It found me, on leaving school, almost a child. 

This time between 18 and 24 should, I think, count as my proper 

period of puberty, which probably in most children occupies the 

end years of their school-life. 

 

 

 

 

"It was at this time that I began to make a good many friends of 

my own and to become aware of psychical and sexual attractions. I 

had never come across any theories on the subject, but I decided 

that I must belong to a third sex of some kind. I used to wonder 

if I was like the neuter bees! I knew physical and psychical sex 

feeling and yet I seemed to know it quite otherwise from other 


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