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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

1883). She was masculine in character, features, and attire. In 

early life she married and had a child, but had no affection for 

her husband, who eventually left her. As usual in such cases, her 

masculine habits appeared in early childhood. She was expert with 

the rifle, lived the life of a trapper and hunter among the 

Indians, and was known as the "Female Hunter of Long Eddy." She 

published a book regarding those experiences. I have not been 

able to see it, but it is said to be quaint and well written. She 

regarded herself as practically a man, and became attached to a 

young woman of good education, who had also been deserted by her 

husband. The affection was strong and emotional, and, of course, 

without deception. It was interrupted by her recognition and 

imprisonment as a vagabond, but on the petition of her "wife" she 

was released. "I may be a woman in one sense," she said, "but I 

have peculiar organs which make me more a man than a woman." She 

alluded to an enlarged clitoris which she could erect, she said, 

as a turtle protrudes its head, but there was no question of its 

use in coitus. She was ultimately brought to the asylum with 

paroxysmal attacks of exaltation and erotomania (without 

self-abuse apparently) and corresponding periods of depression, 

and she died with progressive dementia. I may also mention the 

case (briefly recorded in the _Lancet_, February 22, 1884) of a 

person called John Coulter, who was employed for twelve years as 

a laborer by the Belfast Harbor Commissioners. When death 

resulted from injuries caused in falling down stairs, it was 

found that this person was a woman. She was fifty years of age, 

and had apparently spent the greater part of her life as a man. 

When employed in early life as a manservant on a farm, she had 

married her mistress's daughter. The pair were married for 

twenty-nine years, but during the last six years lived apart, 

owing to the "husband's" dissipated habits. No one ever suspected 

her sex. She was of masculine appearance and good muscular 

development. The "wife" took charge of the body and buried it. 

 

 

A more recent case of the same kind is that of "Murray Hall," who 

died in New York in 1901. Her real name was Mary Anderson, and 

she was born at Govan, in Scotland. Early left an orphan, on the 

death of her only brother she put on his clothes and went to 

Edinburgh, working as a man. Her secret was discovered during an 

illness, and she finally went to America, where she lived as a 

man for thirty years, making money, and becoming somewhat 

notorious as a Tammany politician, a rather riotous "man about 

town." The secret was not discovered till her death, when it was 

a complete revelation, even to her adopted daughter. She married 

twice; the first marriage ended in separation, but the second 

marriage seemed to have been happy, for it lasted twenty years, 

when the "wife" died. She associated much with pretty girls, and 

was very jealous of them. She seems to have been slight and not 

very masculine in general build, with a squeaky voice, but her 

ways, attitude, and habits were all essentially masculine. She 

associated with politicians, drank somewhat to excess, though not 

heavily, swore a great deal, smoked and chewed tobacco, sang 

ribald songs; could run, dance, and fight like a man, and had 

divested herself of every trace of feminine daintiness. She wore 

clothes that were always rather too large in order to hide her 

form, baggy trousers, and an overcoat even in summer. She is said 

to have died of cancer of the breast. (I quote from an account, 

which appears to be reliable, contained in the _Weekly 

Scotsman_, February 9, 1901.) 

 

Another case, described in the London papers, is that of 

Catharine Coome, who for forty years successfully personated a 

man and adopted masculine habits generally. She married a lady's 

maid, with whom she lived for fourteen years. Having latterly 

adopted a life of fraud, her case gained publicity as that of the 


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