Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

 

 

Ellen Glenn, _alias_ Ellis Glenn, a notorious swindler, who came 

prominently before the public in Chicago during 1905, was another 

"man-woman," of large and masculine type. She preferred to dress 

as a man and had many love escapades with women. "She can fiddle 

as well as anyone in the State," said a man who knew her, "can 

box like a pugilist, and can dance and play cards." 

 

In Seville, a few years ago, an elderly policeman, who had been 

in attendance on successive governors of that city for thirty 

years, was badly injured in a street accident. He was taken to 

the hospital and the doctor there discovered that the "policeman" 

was a woman. She went by the name of Fernando Mackenzie and 

during the whole of her long service no suspicion whatever was 

aroused as to her sex. She was French by birth, born in Paris in 

1836, but her father was English and her mother Spanish. She 

assumed her male disguise when she was a girl and served her 

time in the French army, then emigrated to Spain, at the age of 

35, and contrived to enter the Madrid police force disguised as a 

man. She married there and pretended that her wife's child was 

her own son. She removed to Seville, still serving as a 

policeman, and was engaged there as cook and orderly at the 

governor's palace. She served seven successive governors. In 

consequence of the discovery of her sex she has been discharged 

from the police without the pension due to her; her wife had died 

two years previously, and "Fernando" spent all she possessed on 

the woman's funeral. Mackenzie had a soft voice, a refined face 

with delicate features, and was neatly dressed in male attire. 

When asked how she escaped detection so long, she replied that 

she always lived quietly in her own house with her wife and did 

her duty by her employers so that no one meddled with her. 

 

In Chicago in 1906 much attention was attracted to the case of 

"Nicholai de Raylan," confidential secretary to the Russian 

Consul, who at death (of tuberculosis) at the age of 33 was found 

to be a woman. She was born in Russia and was in many respects 

very feminine, small and slight in build, but was regarded as a 

man, and even as very "manly," by both men and women who knew her 

intimately. She was always very neat in dress, fastidious in 

regard to shirts and ties, and wore a long-waisted coat to 

disguise the lines of her figure. She was married twice in 

America, being divorced by the first wife, after a union lasting 

ten years, on the ground of cruelty and misconduct with chorus 

girls. The second wife, a chorus girl who had been previously 

married and had a child, was devoted to her "husband." Both wives 

were firmly convinced that their husband was a man and ridiculed 

the idea that "he" could be a woman. I am informed that De Raylan 

wore a very elaborately constructed artificial penis. In her will 

she made careful arrangements to prevent detection of sex after 

death, but these were frustrated, as she died in a hospital. 

 

In St. Louis, in 1909, the case was brought forward of a young 

woman of 22, who had posed as a man for nine years. Her masculine 

career began at the age of 13 after the Galveston flood which 

swept away all her family. She was saved and left Texas dressed 

as a boy. She worked in livery stables, in a plough factory, and 

as a bill-poster. At one time she was the adopted son of the 

family in which she lived and had no difficulty in deceiving her 

sisters by adoption as to her sex. On coming to St. Louis in 1902 

she made chairs and baskets at the American Rattan Works, 

associating with fellow-workmen on a footing of masculine 

equality. One day a workman noticed the extreme smallness and 

dexterity of her hands. "Gee, Bill, you should have been a girl." 

"How do you know I'm not?" she retorted. In such ways her ready 

wit and good humor always, disarmed suspicion as to her sex. She 

shunned no difficulties in her work or in her sports, we are 

told, and never avoided the severest tests. "She drank, she 

swore, she courted girls, she worked as hard as her fellows, she 


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