Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

As regards the general bearing of the inverted woman, in its most 

marked and undisguised form, I may quote an admirable description 

by Prof. Zuccarelli, of Naples, of an unmarried middle-class 

woman of 35: "While retaining feminine garments, her bearing is 

as nearly as possible a man's. She wears her thin hair thrown 

carelessly back _alla Umberto_, and fastened in a simple knot at 

the back of her head. The breasts are little developed, and 

compressed beneath a high corset; her gown is narrow without the 

expansion demanded by fashion. Her straw hat with broad plaits is 

perhaps adorned by a feather, or she wears a small hat like a 

boy's. She does not carry an umbrella or sunshade, and walks out 

alone, refusing the company of men; or she is accompanied by a 

woman, as she prefers, offering her arm and carrying the other 

hand at her waist, with the air of a fine gentleman. In a 

carriage her bearing is peculiar and unlike that habitual with 

women. Seated in the middle of the double seat, her knees being 

crossed or else the legs well separated, with a virile air and 

careless easy movements she turns her head in every direction, 

finding an acquaintance here and there with her eye, saluting men 

and women with a large gesture of the hand as a business man 

would. In conversation her pose is similar; she gesticulates 

much, is vivacious in speech, with much power of mimicry, and 

while talking she arches the inner angles of her eyebrow, making 

vertical wrinkles at the center of her forehead. Her laugh is 

open and explosive and uncovers her white rows of teeth. With men 

she is on terms of careless equality." ("Inversione congenita 

dell'istinto sessuale in una donna," _L'Anomalo_, February, 

1889.) 

 

"The inverted woman," Hirschfeld truly remarks (_Die 

Homosexualitaet_, p. 158), "is more full of life, of enterprise, 

of practical energy, more aggressive, more heroic, more apt for 

adventure, than either the heterosexual woman or the homosexual 

man." Sometimes, he adds, her mannishness may approach reckless 

brutality, and her courage becomes rashness. This author 

observes, however, in another place (p. 272) that, in addition to 

this group of inverted women with masculine traits there is 

another group, "not less large," of equally inverted women who 

are outwardly as thoroughly feminine as are normal women. This is 

not an observation which I am able to confirm. It appears to me 

that the great majority of inverted women possess some masculine 

or boyish traits, even though only as slight as those which may 

occasionally be revealed by normal women. Extreme femininity, in 

my observation, is much more likely to be found in bisexual than 

in homosexual women, just as extreme masculinity is much more 

likely to be found in bisexual than in homosexual men. 

 

While inverted women frequently, though not always, convey an impression 

of mannishness or boyishness, there are no invariable anatomical 

characteristics associated with this impression. There is, for instance, 

no uniform tendency to a masculine distribution of hair. Nor must it be 

supposed that the presence of a beard in a woman indicates a homosexual 

tendency. "Bearded women," as Hirschfeld remarks, are scarcely ever 

inverted, and it would seem that the strongest reversals of secondary 

sexual characters less often accompany homosexuality than slighter 

modifications of these characters.[167] A faint moustache and other slight 

manifestations of hypertrichosis also by no means necessarily indicate 

homosexuality. To some extent it is a matter of race; thus in the Pera 

district of Constantinople, Weissenberg, among nearly seven hundred women 

between about 18 and 50 years of age, noted that 10 per cent, showed hair 

on the upper lip; they were most often Armenians, the Greeks coming 

next.[168] 

 

There has been some dispute as to whether, apart from 

homosexuality, hypertrichosis in a woman can be regarded as an 

indication of a general masculinity. This is denied by Max 

Bartels (in his elaborate study, "Ueber abnorme Behaarung beim 

Menschen," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1876, p. 127; 1881, p. 


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