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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[137] Catharina Margaretha Lincken, who married another woman, somewhat 

after the manner of the Hungarian Countess Sarolta Vay (i.e., with the aid 

of an artificial male organ), was condemned to death for sodomy, and 

executed in 1721 at the age of 27 (F.C. Mueller, "Ein weiterer Fall von 

contraerer Sexualempfindung," _Friedrich's Blaetter fuer Gerichtliche 

Medizin_, Heft 4, 1891). The most fully investigated case of sexual 

inversion in a woman in modern times is that of Countess Sarolta Vay 

(_Friedrich's Blaetter_, Heft, 1, 1891; also Krafft-Ebing, _Psychopathia 

Sexualis_, Eng. trans. of 10th. ed., 416-427; also summarized in Appendix 

E of earlier editions of the present Study). Sarolta always dressed as a 

man, and went through a pseudo-marriage with a girl who was ignorant of 

the real sex of her "husband." She was acquitted and allowed to return 

home and continue dressing as a man. 

 

[138] Anna Rueling has some remarks on this point, _Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle 

Zwischenstufen_, vol. vii, 1905, p. 141 et seq. 

 

[139] This, of course, by no means necessarily indicates the existence of 

sexual inversion, any more than the presence of feminine traits in 

distinguished men. I have elsewhere pointed out (e.g., _Man and Woman_, 

5th ed., 1915, p. 488) that genius in either sex frequently involves the 

coexistence of masculine, feminine, and infantile traits. 

 

[140] Various references to Queen Hatschepsu are given by Hirschfeld (_Die 

Homosexualitaet_, p. 739). Hirschfeld's not severely critical list of 

distinguished homosexual persons includes 18 women. It would not be 

difficult to add others. 

 

[141] Sophie Hochstetter, in a study of Queen Christina in the _Jahrbuch 

fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_ (vol. ix, 1908, p. 168 et seq.), regards 

her as bisexual, while H.J. Schouten (_Monatsschrift fuer 

Kriminalanthropologie_, 1912, Heft 6) concludes that she was homosexual, 

and believes that it was Monaldeschi's knowledge on this point which led 

her to instigate his murder. 

 

[142] Cf. Hans Freimark, _Helena Petrovna Blavatsky_; Levetzow, "Louise 

Michel," _Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, vol. vii, 1905, p. 307 et 

seq. 

 

[143] Rosa Bonheur, the painter, is a specially conspicuous example of 

pronounced masculinity in, a woman of genius. She frequently dressed as a 

man, and when dressed as a woman her masculine air occasionally attracted 

the attention of the police. See Theodore Stanton's biography. 

 

[144] There is some difference of opinion as to whether there is less real 

delinquency among women (see Havelock Ellis, _Man and Woman_, 6th ed., 

1915, p. 469), but we are here concerned with judicial criminality. 

 

[145] This apparently widespread opinion is represented by the remark of a 

young man in the eighteenth century (concerning the Lesbian friend of the 

woman he wishes to marry), quoted in the Comte de Tilly's _Souvenirs_: "I 

confess that that is a kind of rivalry which causes me no annoyance; on 

the contrary it amuses me, and I am immoral enough to laugh at it." That 

attitude of the educated and refined was not probably shared by the 

populace. Madame de Lamballe, who was guillotined at the Revolution, was 

popularly regarded as a tribade, and it was said that on this account her 

charming head received the special insults of the mob. 

 

[146] Havelock Ellis, _Man and Woman_, 5th ed., 1915, especially chapters 

xiii and xv. 

 

[147] Karsch (_Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, vol. iii, 1901, pp. 

85-9) brings together some passages concerning homosexuality in women 

among various peoples. 

 

[148] Gandavo, quoted by Lomaeco, _Archivio per l'Antropologia_, 1889, 

fasc. 1. 

 

[149] _Journal Anthropological Institute_, July-Dec., 1904, p. 342. 

 

[150] G.H. Lowie, "The Assiniboine," Am. Museum of Nat. Hist., 

_Anthropological Papers_, New York, 1909, vol. xiv, p. 223; W. Jones, "Fox 

Texts," _Publications of Am. Ethnological Soc._, Leyden, 1907, vol. i, p. 

151; quoted by D.C. McMurtrie, "A Legend of Lesbian Love Among the North 

American Indians," _Urologic Review_, April, 1914. 

 

[151] _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, Heft 6, 1899, p. 669. 

 

[152] I. Bloch, _Die Prostitution_, vol. i, pp. 180, 181. 

 

[153] Corre, _Crime en Pays Creoles_, 1889. 

 

[154] In a Spanish prison, some years ago, when a new governor endeavored 


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