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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

never adapt herself to any woman's avocations. "She had a natural 

abhorrence to the tending of children." Her disposition was altogether 

masculine; "she was not for mincing obscenity, but would talk freely, 

whatever came uppermost." She never had any children, and was not taxed 

with debauchery: "No man can say or affirm that ever she had a sweetheart 

or any such fond thing to dally with her;" a mastiff was the only living 

thing she cared for. Her life was not altogether honest, but not so much 

from any organic tendency to crime, it seems, as because her abnormal 

nature and restlessness made her an outcast. She was too fond of drink, 

and is said to have been the first woman who smoked tobacco. Nothing is 

said or suggested of any homosexual practices, but we see clearly here 

what may be termed the homosexual diathesis. 

 

[167] Hirschfeld, _Die Homosexualitaet_, p. 137. 

 

[168] S. Weissenberg, _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1892, Heft 4, p. 280. 

 

[169] This case was described by Gasparini, _Archivio di Psichiatria_, 

1908, fasc. 1-2. 

 

[170] Bringing together ten cases of inverted women from various sources 

(including the three original cases mentioned above), in only four were 

the sexual organs normal; in the others they were more or less 

undeveloped. 

 

[171] Homosexual persons generally, male and female, unlike the 

heterosexual, are apt to feel more modesty with persons of the same sex 

than with those of the opposite sex. See, e.g., Hirschfeld, _Die 

Homosexualitaet_, p. 76. 

 

[172] Kryptadia, vol. vi, p. 197. 

 

[173] The term "cunnilinctus" was suggested to me by the late Dr. J. 

Bonus, and I have ever since used it; the Latin authors commonly used 

"cunnilingus" for the actor, but had no corresponding term for the action. 

Hirschfeld has lately used the term "cunnilinctio" in the same sense, but 

such a formation is quite inadmissible. For information on the classic 

terms for this perversion, see, e.g., Iwan Bloch, _Ursprung der Syphilis_, 

vol. ii, p. 612 et seq. 

 

[174] Casanova, _Memoires_, ed. Gamier, vol. iv, p. 597. 

 

[175] Hirschfeld deals in a full and authoritative manner with the 

differential diagnosis of inversion and the other groups of transitional 

sexuality in _Die Homosexualitaet_, ch. ii; also in his fully illustrated 

book _Geschlechtsuebergaenge_, 1905. 

 

[176] Havelock Ellis, "Auto-erotism," in vol. i of these _Studies_; Iwan 

Bloch, _Ursprung der Syphilis_, vol. ii, p. 589; ib., _Die Prostitution_, 

vol, i, pp. 385-6; for early references, Crusius, _Untersuchungen zu den 

Mimiamben der Herondas_, pp. 129-30. 

 

[177] I have found a notice of a similar case in France, during the 

sixteenth century, in Montaigne's _Journal du Voyage en Italie en_ 1850 

(written by his secretary); it took place near Vitry le Francois. Seven or 

eight girls belonging to Chaumont, we are told, resolved to dress and to 

work as men; one of these came to Vitry to work as a weaver, and was 

looked upon as a well-conditioned young man, and liked by everyone. At 

Vitry she became betrothed to a woman, but, a quarrel arising, no marriage 

took place. Afterward "she fell in love with a woman whom she married, and 

with whom she lived for four or five months, to the wife's great 

contentment, it is said; but, having been recognized by some one from 

Chaumont, and brought to justice, she was condemned to be hanged. She said 

she would even prefer this to living again as a girl, and was hanged for 

using illicit inventions to supply the defects of her sex" (_Journal_, ed. 

by d'Ancona, 1889, p. 11). 

 

[178] Roux, _Bulletin Societe d'Anthropologie_, 1905, No. 3. Roux knew a 

Comarian woman who, at the age of 50, after her husband's death, became 

homosexual and made herself an artificial penis which she used with 

younger women. 

 

[179] Hirschfeld, _Die Homosexualitaet_, p. 47. 

 

[180] There are few traces of feminine homosexuality in English social 

history of the past. In Charles the Second's Court, the _Memoires de 

Ghrammont_ tell us, Miss Hobart was credited with Lesbian tendencies. 

"Soon the rumor, true or false, of this singularity spread through the 

court. They were gross enough there never to have heard of that refinement 

of ancient Greece in the tastes of tenderness, and the idea came into 


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