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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

which the visit of a chance patient suggests to him can scarcely be a 

phenomenon of pure suggestion. We have no reason to suppose that this 

physician practised every perversion he heard of from patients; he adopted 

that which fitted his own nature.[190] In another case homosexual advances 

were made to a youth and accepted, but he had already been attracted to 

men in childhood. Again, in another case, there were homosexual 

influences in the boyhood of a subject who became bisexual, but as the 

subject's father was of similar bisexual temperament we can attach no 

potency to the mere suggestions. In another case we find homosexual 

influence in childhood, but the child was already delicate, shy, nervous, 

and feminine, clearly possessing a temperament predestined to develop in a 

homosexual direction. 

 

The irresistible potency of the inner impulse is well illustrated 

in a case presented by Hirschfeld and Burchard: "My daughter 

Erna," said the subject's mother, "showed boyish inclinations at 

the age of 3, and they increased from year to year. She never 

played with dolls, only with tin soldiers, guns, and castles. She 

would climb trees and jump ditches; she made friends with the 

drivers of all the carts that came to our house and they would 

place her on the horse's back. The annual circus was a joy to her 

for all the year. Even as a child of 4 she was so fearless on 

horseback that lookers-on shouted Bravo! and all declared she was 

a born horsewoman. It was her greatest wish to be a boy. She 

would wear her elder brother's clothes all day, notwithstanding 

her grandmother's indignation. Cycling, gymnastics, boating, 

swimming, were her passion, and she showed skill in them. As she 

grew older she hated prettily adorned hats and clothes. I had 

much trouble with her for she would not wear pretty things. The 

older she grew the more her masculine and decided ways developed. 

This excited much outcry and offence. People found my daughter 

unfeminine and disagreeable, but all my trouble and exhortations 

availed nothing to change her." Now this young woman whom all the 

influences of a normal feminine environment failed to render 

feminine was not physiologically a woman at all; the case proved 

to be the unique instance of an individual possessing all the 

external characteristics of a woman combined with internal 

testicular tissue capable of emitting true masculine semen 

through the feminine urethra. No suggestions of the environment 

could suffice to overcome this fundamental fact of internal 

constitution. (Hirschfeld and Burchard, "Spermasekretion aus 

einer weiblichen Harnroehre," _Deutsche medizinische 

Wochenschrift_, No. 52, 1911.) 

 

I may here quote three American cases (not previously published), for 

which I am indebted to Prof. G. Frank Lydston, of Chicago. They seem to me 

to illustrate the only kind of suggestions which play much part in the 

evolution of inversion. I give them in Dr. Lydston's words:-- 

 

 

CASE I.--A man, 45 years of age, attracted by the allusion to my 

essay on "Social Perversion" contained in the English translation 

of Krafft-Ebing's _Psychopathia Sexualis_, consulted me regarding 

the possible cure of his condition. This individual was a finely 

educated, very intelligent man, who was an excellent linguist, 

had considerable musical ability, and was in the employ of a firm 

whose business was such as to demand on the part of its employes 

considerable legal acumen, clerical ability, and knowledge of 

real-estate transactions. This man stated that at the age of 

puberty, without any knowledge of perversity of sexual feeling, 

he was thrown intimately in contact with males of more advanced 

years, who took various means to excite his sexual passions, the 

result being that perverted sexual practices were developed, 

which were continued for a number of years. He thereafter noticed 

an aversion to women. At the solicitations of his family he 

finally married, without any very intelligent idea as to what, if 

anything, might be expected of him in the marital relation. 


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