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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

seem to find the highest degree of success and reputation. At least half a 

dozen of my subjects are successful men of letters, and I could easily 

add others by going outside the group of Histories included in this study. 

They especially cultivate those regions of _belles-lettres_ which lie on 

the borderland between prose and verse. Though they do not usually attain 

much eminence in poetry, they are often very accomplished writers of 

verse. They may be attracted to history, but rarely attempt tasks of great 

magnitude, involving much patient labor, though to this rule there are 

exceptions. Pure science seems to have relatively little attraction for 

the homosexual.[220] 

 

An examination of my Histories reveals the interesting fact that 45 of the 

subjects, or in the proportion of 56 per cent., possess artistic aptitudes 

of varying degree. Galton found, from the investigation of nearly 1000 

persons, that the average showing artistic tastes in England was only 

about 30 per cent. It must also be said that my figures are probably below 

the truth, as no special point was made of investigating the matter, and 

also that in some cases the artistic ability is of high order. 

 

It is suggested that Adler's theory of 

_Minderwertigkeit_--according to which we react strenuously 

against our congenital organic defects and fortify them into 

virtues--may be applied to the invert's acquirement of artistic 

abilities (G. Rosenstein, "Die Theorien der Organminderwertigkeit 

und die Bisexualitaet," _Jahrbuch fuer Psychoanalytische 

Forschungen_, vol. ii, 1910, p. 398). This theory is in some 

cases of valuable application, but it seems doubtful to me 

whether it is very profitable in the present connection. The 

artistic aptitudes of inverts may better be regarded as part of 

their organic tendencies than as a reaction against those 

tendencies. In this connection I may quote the remarks of an 

American correspondent, himself homosexual: "Regarding the 

connection between inversion and artistic capacity, so far as I 

can see, the temperament of every invert seems to strive to find 

artistic expression--crudely or otherwise. Inverts, as a rule, 

seek the paths of life that lie in pleasant places; their 

resistance to opposing obstacles is elastic, their work is never 

strenuous (if they can help it), and their accomplishments hardly 

ever of practical use. This is all true of the born artist, as 

well. Both inverts and artists are inordinately fond of praise; 

both yearn for a life where admiration is the reward for little 

energy. In a word, they seem to be 'born tired,' begotten by 

parents who were tired, too." 

 

Hirschfeld (_Die Homosexualitaet_, p. 66) gives a list of pictures 

and sculptures which specially appeal to the homosexual. 

Prominent among them are representations of St. Sebastian, 

Gainsborough's Blue Boy, Vandyck's youthful men, the Hermes of 

Praxiteles, Michelangelo's Slave, Rodin's and Meunier's 

working-men types. 

 

As regards music, my cases reveal the aptitude which has been 

remarked by others as peculiarly common among inverts. It has 

been extravagantly said that all musicians are inverts; it is 

certain that various famous musicians, among the dead and the 

living, have been homosexual. Ingegnieros speaks of a 

"genito-musical synaesthesia," analogous to color-hearing, in this 

connection. Calesia states (_Archivio di Psichiatria_, 1900, p. 

209) that 60 per cent, inverts are musicians. Hirschfeld (_Die 

Homosexualitaet_, p. 500) regards this estimate as excessive, but 

he himself elsewhere states (p. 175) that 98 per cent, of male 

inverts are greatly attracted to music, the women being decidedly 

less attracted. Oppenheim (in a paper summarized in the 

_Neurologische Centralblatt_ for June 1, 1910, and the _Alienist 

and Neurologist_ for Nov., 1910) well remarks that the musical 

disposition is marked by a great emotional instability, and this 

instability is a disposition to nervousness. It is thus that 

neurasthenia is so common among musicians. The musician has not 

been rendered nervous by the music, but he owes his nervousness 


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