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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[183] The following analysis is based on somewhat fuller versions of my 

Histories than it was necessary to publish in the preceding chapters, as 

well as on various other Histories which are not here published at all. 

Numerous apparent discrepancies may thus be explained. 

 

[184] This frequency of nervous symptoms is in accordance with the most 

reliable observation everywhere. Thus, Hirschfeld (_Die Homosexualitaet_, 

p. 177) states that of 500 inverts, 62 per cent. showed nervous symptoms 

of one kind or another: sleeplessness, sleepiness, tremors, stammering, 

etc. 

 

[185] Hirschfeld finds that 54 per cent, of inverts become conscious of 

their anomaly under the age of 14. The anomaly may, however, be present at 

this early age, but not consciously until later. Hence the larger 

percentage recorded above. 

 

[186] In this connection I may quote an observation by Raffalovich: "It is 

natural that the invert should very clearly recall the precocity of his 

inclinations. In the existence of every invert a moment arrives when he 

discovers the enigma of his homosexual tastes. He then classes all his 

recollections, and to justify himself in his own eyes he remembers that he 

has been what he is from his earliest childhood. Homosexuality has colored 

all his young life; he has thought over it, dreamed over it, reflected 

over it--very often in perfect innocence. When he was quite small he 

imagined that he had been carried off by brigands, by savages; at 5 or 6 

he dreamed of the warmth of their chests and of their naked arms. He 

dreamed that he was their slave and he loved his slavery and his masters. 

He has had not the least thought that is crudely sexual, but he has 

discovered his sentimental vocation." 

 

[187] Leppmann mentions a case (certainly extreme and abnormal) of a 

little girl of 8 who spent the night hidden on the roof, merely in order 

to be able to observe in the morning the sexual organs of an adult male 

cousin (_Bulletin de l'Union Internationale de Droit Penal_, 1896, p. 

118). 

 

[188] I fully admit, as all investigators must, the difficulty of tracing 

the influence of early suggestions, especially in dealing with persons who 

are unaccustomed to self-analysis. Sometimes it happens, especially in 

regard to erotic fetichism, that, while direct questioning fails to reach 

any early formative suggestion, such influence is casually elicited on a 

subsequent occasion. 

 

[189] I may add that I see no fundamental irreconcilability between the 

point of view here adopted and the facts brought forward (and wrongly 

interpreted) by Schrenck-Notzing. In his _Beitraege zur AEtiologie der 

Contraerer Sexualempfindung_ (Vienna, 1895), this writer states: "The 

neuropathic disposition is congenital, as is the tendency to precocious 

appearance of the appetites, the lack of psychic resistance, and the 

tendency to imperative associations; but that heredity can extend to the 

object of the appetite, and influence the contents of these characters, is 

not shown. Psychological experiences are against it, and the possibility, 

which I have shown, of changing these impulses by experiment and so 

removing their danger to the character of the individual." It need not be 

asserted that "heredity extends to the object of the appetite," but simply 

that heredity culminates in an organism which is sexually best satisfied 

by that object. It is also a mistake to suppose that congenital characters 

cannot be, in some cases, largely modified by such patient and laborious 

processes as those carried on by Schrenck-Notzing. In the same pamphlet 

this writer refers to moral insanity and idiocy as supporting his point of 

view. It is curious that both these congenital manifestations had 

independently occurred to me as arguments against his position. The 

experiences of Elmira Reformatory and Bicetre--not to mention institutions 

of more recent establishment--long since showed that both the morally 

insane and the idiotic can be greatly improved by appropriate treatment. 

Schrenck-Notzing seems to be unduly biased by his interest in hypnotism 

and suggestion. 

 

[190] "If an invert acquires, under the influence of external conditions," 

Fere wrote with truth (_L'Instinct Sexuel_, p. 238), "it is because he was 


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