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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

entirely the notion that the direction of the sexual impulse is merely a 

suggested phenomenon; such a notion is entirely opposed to observation and 

experience, and will with difficulty fit into a rational biological 

scheme. 

 

The Freudians--alike of the orthodox and the heterodox schools--have 

sometimes contributed, unintentionally or not, to revive the now 

antiquated conception of homosexuality as an acquired phenomenon, and that 

by insisting that its mechanism is a purely psychic though unconscious 

process which may be readjusted to the normal order by psychoanalytic 

methods. Freud first put forth a comprehensive statement of his view of 

homosexuality in the original and pregnant little book, _Drei Abhandlungen 

zur Sexualtheorie_ (1905), and has elsewhere frequently touched on the 

subject, as have many other psychoanalysts, including Alfred Adler and 

Stekel, who no longer belong to the orthodox Freudian school. When inverts 

are psycho-analytically studied, Freud believes, it is found that in early 

childhood they go through a phase of intense but brief fixation on a 

woman, usually the mother, or perhaps sister. Then, an internal censure 

inhibiting this incestuous impulse, they overcome it by identifying 

themselves with women and taking refuge in Narcissism, the self becoming 

the sexual object. Finally they look for youthful males resembling 

themselves, whom they love as their mothers loved them. Their pursuit of 

men is thus determined by their flight from women. This view has been set 

forth not only by Freud but by Sadger, Stekel, and many others.[225] Freud 

himself, however, is careful to state that this process only represents 

one type of stunted sexual activity, and that the problem of inversion is 

complex and diversified. 

 

This view may be said to assume a bisexual constitution as 

normal, and homosexuality arises by the suppression, owing to 

some accident, of the heterosexual component, and the path 

through an autoerotic process of Narcissism to homosexuality. On 

this general Freudian conception of homosexuality numerous 

variations have been based, and separate features specially 

emphasized, by individual psychoanalysts. Thus Sadger considers 

that, beneath the male individual loved by the invert, a female 

is concealed, and that this fact may be revealed by 

psychoanalysis which removes the upper layer of the psychic 

palimpsest; he believes that this disposition of the invert is 

favored by a frequent mixture of male and female traits in his 

near relatives; originally, "it is not man whom the homosexual 

man loves and desires but man and woman together in one form"; 

the heterosexual element is later suppressed, and then pure 

inversion is left. Further, developing Freud's view of the 

importance of anal eroticism (Freud, _Sammlung Kleiner Schriften 

zur Neurosenlehre_, vol. ii), Sadger thinks that it is even the 

rule for a passive invert to have experienced anal eroticism in 

childhood and been frequently subjected to enemas, which have led 

to the desire for the anal intromission of the penis. 

(_Medizinische Klinik_, 1909, No. 2.) Jekels pushes this doctrine 

further and declares that all inverts are really passive; the 

invert is, in his love, he states, both subject and object; he 

identifies himself with his mother and sees in the object of his 

love his own youthful person. And what, Jekels asks, is the aim 

of this mental arrangement? It can scarcely by other, he replies, 

than in the part of the mother to stimulate the anal region of 

the object which has now become himself, and to procure the same 

pleasure which in childhood he experienced when his mother 

satisfied his anal eroticism. Jekels regards this view as the 

continuation and concretization of Freud's interpretation; and 

the main point in homosexuality, even when apparently passive, 

becomes the craving for anal-erotic satisfaction (L. Jekels, 

"Einige Bemerkungen zur Trieblehre," _Internationale Zeitschrift 

fuer Aerztliche Psychoanalyse_, Sept., 1913). Most psychoanalysts 

are cautious in denying a constitutional or congenital basis to 

inversion, though they leave it in the background. Ferenczi, in 


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