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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

whether lesser grades do not occur.... Remote evidence of 

bisexuality in the human subject may, perhaps, be afforded by the 

psychical phenomenon of sexual perversion and inversion." 

Similarly in a case of unilateral secondary male character in an 

otherwise female pheasant, C.J. Bond has more recently shown 

(Section of Zooelogy, Birmingham Meeting of British Medical 

Association, _British Medical Journal_, Sept. 20, 1913) that an 

ovi-testis was present, with degenerating ovarian tissue and 

developing testicular tissue, and such islands of actively 

growing male tissue can frequently be found, he states, in the 

degenerating ovaries of female birds which have put forth male 

plumage. Sir John Bland-Sutton, referring to the fact that the 

external conformation of the body affords no positive certainty 

as to the nature of the internal sexual glands, adds (_British 

Medical Journal_, Oct. 30, 1909): "It is a fair presumption that 

some examples of sexual frigidity and sex perversion may be 

explained by the possibility that the individuals concerned may 

possess sexual glands opposite in character to those indicated by 

the external configuration of their bodies." Looking at the 

matter more broadly and fundamentally in its normal aspects, 

Heape declares (_Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical 

Society_, vol. xiv, part ii, 1907) that "there is no such thing 

as a pure male or female animal, but that all contain a dominant 

and recessive sex, except those hermaphrodites in which both 

sexes are equally represented.... There seems to me ample 

evidence for the conclusion that there is no such thing as a pure 

male or female." F.H.A. Marshall, again, in his standard manual, 

_The Physiology of Reproduction_ (1910, p. 655 et seq.), is 

inclined to accept the same view. "If it be true," he remarks, 

"that all individuals are potentially bisexual and that changed 

circumstances, leading to a changed metabolism, may, in 

exceptional circumstances, even in adult life, cause the 

development of the recessive characters, it would seem extremely 

probable that the dominance of one set of sexual characters over 

the other may be determined in some cases at an early stage of 

development in response to a stimulus which may be either 

internal or external." So also Berry Hart ("Atypical Male and 

Female Sex-Ensemble," a paper read before Edinburgh Obstetrical 

Society, _British Medical Journal_, June 20, 1914, p. 1355) 

regards the normal male or female as embodying a maximum of the 

potent organs of his or her own sex with a minimum of non-potent 

organs of the other sex, with secondary sex traits congruent. Any 

increase in the minimum gives a diminished maximum and 

non-congruence of the secondary characters. 

 

We thus see that the ancient medico-philosophic conception of organic 

bisexuality put forth by the Greeks as the key to the explanation of 

sexual inversion, after sinking out of sight for two thousand years, was 

revived early in the nineteenth century by two amateur philosophers who 

were themselves inverted (Hoessli, Ulrichs), as well as by a genuine 

philosopher who was not inverted (Schopenhauer). Then the conception of 

latent bisexuality, independently of homosexuality, was developed from the 

purely scientific side (by Darwin and evolutionists generally). In the 

next stage this conception was adopted by the psychiatric and other 

scientific authorities on homosexuality (Krafft-Ebing and the majority of 

other students). Finally, embryologists, physiologists of sex and 

biologists generally, not only accept the conception of bisexuality, but 

admit that it probably helps to account for homosexuality. In this way the 

idea may be said to have passed into current thought. We cannot assert 

that it constitutes an adequate explanation of homosexuality, but it 

enables us in some degree to understand what for many is a mysterious 

riddle, and it furnishes a useful basis for the classification not only 

of homosexuality, but of the other mixed or intermediate sexual anomalies 

in the same group. The chief of these intermediate sexual anomalies are: 


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