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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and occasionally carried out, as in a case I have recorded in a previous 

chapter (History XXVI). Like all methods of treatment, it is sometimes 

believed to have been successful by those who carried it out. Usually, 

after a short period, it is found to be unsuccessful, and in some cases 

the condition, especially the mental condition, is rendered worse. It is 

not difficult to understand why this should be. Sexual inversion, is not a 

localized genital condition. It is a diffused condition, and firmly 

imprinted on the whole psychic state. There may be reasons for castration, 

or the slighter operation of vasectomy, but, although sexual tension may 

be thereby diminished, no authority now believes that any such operation 

will affect the actual inversion. Castration of the body in adult age 

cannot be expected to produce castration of the mind. Moll, Fere, Naecke, 

Bloch, Rohleder, Hirschfeld, are all either opposed to castration for 

inversion, or very doubtful as to any beneficial results. 

 

In a case communicated to me by Dr. Shufeldt, an invert had 

himself castrated at the age of 26 to diminish sexual desire, 

make himself more like a woman, and to stop growth of beard. "But 

the only apparent physical effect," he wrote, "was to increase my 

weight 10 per cent., and render me a semi-invalid for the rest 

of my life. After two years my sexuality decreased, but that may 

have been due to satiety or to advancing years. I was also 

rendered more easily irritated over trifles and more revengeful. 

Terrible criminal auto-suggestions came into my head, never 

experienced before." Fere (_Revue de Chirurgie_, March 10, 1905) 

published the case of an invert of English origin who had been 

castrated. The inverted impulse remained unchanged, as well as 

sexual desire and the aptitude for erection; but neurasthenic 

symptoms, which had existed before, were aggravated; he felt less 

capable to resist his impulses, became migratory in his habits of 

life, and addicted to the use of laudanum. In a case recorded by 

C.H. Hughes (_Alienist and Neurologist_, Aug., 1914) the results 

were less unsatisfactory; in this case the dorsal nerve of the 

penis was first excised, without any result (see also _Alienist 

and Neurologist_, Feb., 1904, p. 70, as regards worse than 

useless results of cutting the pudic nerve), and a year or so 

later the testes were removed and the patient gained tranquillity 

and satisfaction; his homosexual inclinations appeared to go, and 

he began to show inclination for asexualized women, being 

specially anxious to meet with a woman whose ovaries had been 

removed on account of inversion. (Reference may also be made to 

Naecke, "Die Ersten Kastrationen aus sozialen Grunden auf 

europaeischen Boden," _Neurologisches Centralblatt_, 1909, No. 5, 

and E. Wilhelm in _Juristisch-psychiatrische Grenzfragen_, vol. 

viii, Heft 6 and 7, 1911.) 

 

More trust has usually been placed in the psychotherapeutical than the 

surgical treatment of homosexuality. At one time hypnotic suggestion was 

carried out very energetically on homosexual subjects. Krafft-Ebing seems 

to have been the first distinguished advocate of hypnotism for application 

to the homosexual. Dr. von Schrenck-Notzing displayed special zeal and 

persistency in this treatment. He undertook to treat even the most 

pronounced cases of inversion by courses lasting more than a year, and 

involving, in at least one case, nearly one hundred and fifty hypnotic 

sittings; he prescribed frequent visits to the brothel, previous to which 

the patient took large doses of alcohol; by prolonged manipulations a 

prostitute endeavored to excite erection, a process attended with varying 

results. It appears that in some cases this course of treatment was 

attended by a certain sort of success, to which an unlimited good will on 

the part of the patient, it is needless to say, largely contributed. The 

treatment was, however, usually interrupted by continual backsliding to 

homosexual practices, and sometimes, naturally, the cure involved a 

venereal disorder. The patient was enabled to marry and to beget 


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