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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

For the sake of the possible offspring, also, marriage is to be avoided. 

It is sometimes entirely for the sake of children that the invert desires 

to marry. But it must be pointed out that homosexuality is undoubtedly in 

many cases inherited. Often, it is true, the children turn out fairly 

well, but, in many cases, they bear witness that they belong to a neurotic 

and failing stock;[261] Hirschfeld goes so far as to say that it is always 

so, and concludes that from the eugenic standpoint the marriage of a 

homosexual person is always very risky. In a large number of cases such 

marriages prove sterile. The tendency to sexual inversion in eccentric and 

neurotic families seems merely to be nature's merciful method of winding 

up a concern which, from her point of view, has ceased to be profitable. 

 

As a rule, inverts have no desire to be different from what they 

are, and, if they have any desire for marriage, it is usually 

only momentary. Very pathetic appeals for help are, however, 

sometimes made. I may quote from a letter addressed to me by a 

gentleman who desired advice on this matter: "In part, I write to 

you as a moralist and, in part, as to a physician. Dr. Q. has 

published a book in which, without discussion, hypnotic treatment 

of such cases was reported as successful. I am eager to know if 

your opinion remains what it was. This new assurance comes from a 

man whose moral firmness and delicacy are unquestionable, but you 

will easily imagine how one might shrink from the implantation of 

new impulses in the unconscious self, since newly created 

inclinations might disturb the conditions of life. At any rate, 

in my ignorance of hypnotism I fear that the effort to give the 

normal instinct might lead to marriage without the assurance that 

the normal instinct would be stable. I write, therefore, to 

explain my present condition and crave your counsel. It is with 

the greatest reluctance that I reveal the closely guarded secret 

of my life. I have no other abnormality, and have not hitherto 

betrayed my abnormal instinct. I have never made any person the 

victim of passion: moral and religious feelings were too 

powerful. I have found my reverence for other souls a perfect 

safeguard against any approach to impurity. I have never had 

sexual interest in women. Once I had a great friendship with a 

beautiful and noble woman, without any mixture of sexual feeling 

on my part. I was ignorant of my condition, and I have the bitter 

regret of having caused in her a hopeless love--proudly and 

tragically concealed to her death. My friendships with men, 

younger men, have been colored by passion, against which I have 

fought continually. The shame of this has made life a hell, and 

the horror of this abnormality, since I came to know it as such, 

has been an enemy to my religious faith. Here there could be no 

case of a divinely given instinct which I was to learn to use in 

a rational and chaste fashion, under the control of spiritual 

loyalty. The power which gave me life seemed to insist on my 

doing that for which the same power would sting me with remorse. 

If there is no remedy I must either cry out against the injustice 

of this life of torment between nature and conscience, or submit 

to the blind trust of baffled ignorance. If there is a remedy 

life will not seem to be such an intolerable ordeal. I am not 

pleading that I must succumb to impulse. I do not doubt that a 

pure celibate life is possible so far as action is concerned. But 

I cannot discover that friendship with younger men can go on 

uncolored by a sensuous admixture which fills me with shame and 

loathing. The gratification of passion--normal or abnormal--is 

repulsive to esthetic feeling. I am nearly 42 and I have always 

diverted myself from personal interests that threatened to become 

dangerous to me. More than a year ago, however, a new fate seemed 

to open to my unhappy and lonely life. I became intimate with a 

young man of 20, of the rarest beauty of form and character. I am 

confident that he is and always has been pure. He lives an 


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