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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

exalted moral and religious life dominated by the idea that he 

and all men are partners of the divine nature, and able in the 

strength of that nature to be free from evil. I believe him to be 

normal. He shows pleasure in the society of attractive young 

women and in an innocent, light-hearted way refers to the time 

when he may be able to marry. He is a general favorite, but 

turned to me as to a friend and teacher. He is poor, and it was 

possible for me to guarantee him a good education. I began to 

help him from the longings of a lonely life. I wanted a son and 

a friend in my inward desolation. I craved the companionship of 

this pure and happy nature. I felt such a reverence for him that 

I hoped to find the sensuous element in me purged away by his 

purity. I am, indeed, utterly incapable of doing him harm; I am 

not morally weak; nevertheless the sensuous element is there, and 

it poisons my happiness. He is ardently affectionate and 

demonstrative. He spends the summers with me in Europe, and the 

tenderness he feels for me has prompted him at times to embrace 

and kiss me as he always has done to his father. Of late I have 

begun to fear that without will or desire I may injure the 

springs of feeling in him, especially if it is true that the 

homosexual tendency is latent in most men. The love he shows me 

is my joy, but a poisoned joy. It is the bread and wine of life 

to me; but I dare not think what his ardent affection might ripen 

into. I can go on fighting the battle of good and evil in my 

attachment to him, but I cannot define my duty to him. To shun 

him would be cruelty and would belie his trust in human fidelity. 

Without my friendship he will not take my money--the condition of 

a large career. I might, indeed, explain to him what I explain to 

you, but the ordeal and shame are too great, and I cannot see 

what good it would do. If he has the capacity of homosexual 

feeling he might be violently stimulated; if he is incapable of 

it, he would feel repulsion. 

 

"Suppose, then, that I should seek hypnotic treatment, I still do 

not know what tricks an abnormal nature might play me when 

diverted by suggestion. I might lose the joy of this friendship 

without any compensation. I am afraid; I am afraid! Might I not 

be influenced to shun the only persons who inspire unselfish 

feeling? 

 

"Bear with this account of my story. Many virtues are easy for 

me, and my life is spent in pursuits of culture. Alas, that all 

the culture with which I am credited, all the prayers and 

aspirations, all the strong will and heroic resolves have not rid 

my nature of this evil bent! What I long for is the right to 

love, not for the mere physical gratification, for the right to 

take another into the arms of my heart and profess all the 

tenderness I feel, to find my joy in planning his career with 

him, as one who is rightfully and naturally entitled to do so. I 

crave this since I cannot have a son. I leave the matter here. 

 

"When I read what I have written I see how pointless it is. It is 

possible, indeed, that brooding over my personal calamity 

magnifies in my mind the sense of danger to this friend through 

me, and that I only need to find the right relation of 

friendliness coupled with aloofness which will secure him against 

any too ardent attachment. Certainly I have no fear that I shall 

forget myself. Yet two things array themselves on the other 

side: I rebel inwardly against the necessity of isolating myself 

as if I were a pestilence, and I rebel against the taint of 

sensuous feeling. The normal man can feel that his instinct is no 

shame when the spirit is in control. I know that to the 

consciousness of others my instinct itself would be a shame and a 

baseness, and I have no tendency to construct a moral system for 

myself. I have, to be sure, moments when I declare to myself that 

I will have my sensuous gratification as well as other men, but, 

the moment I think of the wickedness of it, the rebellion is soon 

over. The disesteem of self, the sense of taint, the necessity of 


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