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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

withdrawing from happiness lest I communicate my taint, that is a 

spiritual malady which makes the ground-tone of my existence one 

of pain and melancholy. Should you have only some moral 

consolation without the promise of medical assistance I should 

feel grateful." 

 

In such a case as this, one can do little more than advise the 

sufferer that, however painful his lot may be, it is not without 

its consolations, and that he would be best advised to pursue, as 

cheerfully as may be, the path that he has already long since 

marked out for himself. The invert sometimes fails to realize 

that for no man with high moral ideals, however normal he may be, 

is the conduct of life easy, and that if the invert has to be 

satisfied with affection without passion, and to live a life of 

chastity, he is doing no more than thousands of normal men have 

done, voluntarily and contentedly. As to hypnotism in such a case 

as this, it is altogether unreasonable to expect that suggestion 

will supplant the deeply rooted organic impulses that have grown 

up during a lifetime. 

 

We may thus conclude that in the treatment of inversion the most 

satisfactory result is usually obtained when it is possible by direct and 

indirect methods to reduce the sexual hyperesthesia which frequently 

exists, and by psychic methods to refine and spiritualize the inverted 

impulse, so that the invert's natural perversion may not become a cause of 

acquired perversity in others. The invert is not only the victim of his 

own abnormal obsession, he is the victim of social hostility. We must seek 

to distinguish the part in his sufferings due to these two causes. When I 

review the cases I have brought forward and the mental history of inverts 

I have known, I am inclined to say that if we can enable an invert to be 

healthy, selfrestrained and selfrespecting, we have often done better than 

to convert him into the mere feeble simulacrum of a normal man. An appeal 

to the _paiderastia_ of the best Greek days, and the dignity, temperance, 

even chastity, which it involved, will sometimes find a ready response in 

the emotional, enthusiastic nature of the congenital invert. Plato's 

Dialogues have frequently been found a source of great help and 

consolation by inverts. The "manly love" celebrated by Walt Whitman in 

_Leaves of Grass_, although it may be of more doubtful value for general 

use, furnishes a wholesome and robust ideal to the invert who is 

insensitive to normal ideals.[262] 

 

Among recent books, _Iolaeus: An Anthology of Friendship_, edited 

by Edward Carpenter, may be recommended. A similar book in 

German, of a more extended character, is _Lieblingminne und 

Freudesliebe in der Weltliteratur_, edited by Elisar von Kupffer. 

Mention may also be made of the _Freundschaft_ (1912) of Baron 

von Gleichen-Russwurm, a sort of literary history of friendship, 

without specific reference to homosexuality, although many 

writers of inverted tendency are introduced. Platen's 

_Tagebuecher_ are notable as the diary of an invert of high 

character and ideals. The volumes of the _Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle 

Zwischenstufen_ contain many studies bearing on the ideal and 

esthetic aspects of homosexuality. 

 

Various modern poets of high ability have given expression to 

emotions of exalted or passionate friendship toward individuals 

of the same sex, whether or not such friendship can properly be 

termed homosexual. It is scarcely necessary to refer to _In 

Memoriam_, in which Tennyson enshrined his affection for his 

early friend, Arthur Hallam, and developed a picture of the 

universe on the basis of that affection. The poems of Edward 

Cracroft Lefroy are notable, and Mr. John Gambril Nicholson has 

privately issued several volumes of verse (_A Chaplet of 

Southernwood, A Garland of Ladslove_, etc.) showing delicate 

charm combined with high technical skill. Some books mainly or 

entirely written in prose may fairly be included in the same 

group. Such are _In the Key of Blue_, by John Addington Symonds, 

and the _Memoirs of Arthur Hamilton_ (published anonymously by a 


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