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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

sexual acts, so called, alone) without thereby becoming 

criminals. One of us who would, under any circumstances, seduce a 

person of his own sex of immature age, and particularly one whose 

sexual complexion was unknown, deserves the severe punishment 

which would be meted out to a normal person who did the same to a 

young girl--_but no more_; while, so long as no public offense is 

given, there should be _no penalty or obloquy whatever_ attached 

to sexual acts committed with full consent between mature 

persons. These acts may or may not be wrong and immoral, just as 

sexual acts between mature persons of different sexes may or may 

not be wrong or immoral. But in neither case has the law any 

concern; and public opinion should make no distinction between 

the two. It is in the highest degree important that it should be 

clearly understood that we want no relaxation of moral 

obligations. At present we suffer an inconceivably cruel wrong." 

 

We have always to remember, and there is, indeed, no possibility of 

forgetting, that the question of homosexuality is a social question. 

Within certain limits, the gratification of the normal sexual impulse, 

even outside marriage, arouses no general or profound indignation; and is 

regarded as a private matter; rightly or wrongly, the gratification of the 

homosexual impulse is regarded as a public matter. This attitude is more 

or less exactly reflected in the law. Thus it happens that whenever a man 

is openly detected in a homosexual act, however exemplary his life may 

previously have been, however admirable it may still be in all other 

relations, every ordinary normal citizen, however licentious and 

pleasure-loving his own life may be, feels it a moral duty to regard the 

offender as hopelessly damned and to help in hounding him out of society. 

At very brief intervals cases occur, and without reaching the newspapers 

are more or less widely known, in which distinguished men in various 

fields, not seldom clergymen, suddenly disappear from the country or 

commit suicide in consequence of some such exposure or the threat of it. 

It is probable that many obscure tragedies could find their explanation in 

a homosexual cause. 

 

Some of the various tragic ways in which homosexual passions are 

revealed to society may be illustrated by the following 

communication from a correspondent, not himself inverted, who 

here narrates cases that came under his observation in various 

parts of the United States. The cases referred to will be known 

to many, but I have disguised the names of persons and places:-- 

 

"At the age of 14 I was a chorister at ---- church, whose 

choirmaster, an Englishman named M.W.M., was an accomplished man, 

seemingly a perfect gentleman, and a devout churchman. He never 

seemed to care for the society of ladies, never mingled much with 

the men, but sought companionship with the choristers of my age. 

He frequently visited at the homes of his favorites, to tea, and 

when he asked the parents' consent for George's or Frank's 

company on an excursion or to the theater, and then to spend the 

night with him, such request was invariably granted. I shall ever 

remember my first night with him; he began by fondling and 

caressing me, quieting my alarm by assurances of not hurting me, 

and after invoking me to secrecy and with promises of many future 

pleasures, I consented to his desire or passion, which he seemed 

to satisfy by an attempt at _fellatio_. Was this depravity? I 

would say 'No!' after reading his subsequent confession, found in 

his room after his death by suicide. This was brought about by 

his too intimate relations with the rector's son who contracted 

St. Vitus's dance and in the delirium of a fever that followed 

from nervous exhaustion told of him and his doings. A thorough 

investigation took place and M. fled, a broken-hearted and 

disgraced man, who, as the result of remorse, relentless 

persecution, and exposure through several years, ended his life 

by drowning himself. In his confession he spoke of having been 

raised under a very strong moral restraint and having lived an 


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