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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

exemplary life, with the exception of this strange desire that 

his will-power could not control. 

 

"The next case is that of C.H. He came of an old family of brainy 

men who have, and do yet, occupy prominent places in the pulpit 

and the bar, and was himself a gifted young attorney. I knew him 

intimately, as for six years he was a close neighbor and we were 

associated in lodge-work. He was an effeminate little fellow: 

height, 5 feet 2 inches; weight, 105 pounds; very near-sighted; 

and he had a light voice, not a treble or falsetto, but still a 

voice that detracted materially from the beautiful rhetoric that 

flowed from his lips. He had served his country as its 

representative in the Legislature and had received the nomination 

for senator, over a hard-fought political battle. The last 

canvass and speeches were made at a town which was, in 

consequence, crowded. That night H. had to occupy a room with a 

stranger, named E., a travelling salesman. There were two beds in 

this room. Mr. E., on the following day told several people that 

during the night he was awakened by H., who had come over to his 

bed and had his mouth on his 'person,' and that he had threatened 

to kick him out of the room, but that H. pleaded with him and 

fell on his knees and swore that he had been overcome by a 

passion that he had heretofore controlled, and begged of him not 

to expose him. These facts coming to the notice of his opponents, 

within twenty-four hours, they hastened to take advantage of it 

by placarding H. as a second Oscar Wilde, and stating the facts 

as far as decency and the law allowed. H.'s friends came to him 

and gave him one of two alternatives: if guilty, either to kill 

himself or leave that section forever; if not guilty, to slay his 

traducer, E.H. affirmed his innocence, and in company with two 

friends, C. and J., took the train for ----. Learning there that 

E. was at a town twelve miles east, they hired a fast livery and 

drove overland. They found E. at the station, awaiting the 

arrival of a train. H., with a pistol, strode forward and in his 

excitement said: 'You exposed me, did you?' Being near-sighted, 

his aim proved wide of the mark. E. sprang forward and grappled 

with H. for possession of the pistol, and was fired upon by C. 

and J., who shot him in the back. He expired in a few minutes, 

his last statement being to the effect that H. was guilty as 

accused. H., C., and J. were sentenced to the penitentiary for 

life. During my six years' acquaintance with H. I knew of nothing 

derogatory to his character, nor has anyone ever come forward to 

say that on any other occasion he ever displayed this weakness. I 

know his early life had a pure atmosphere, as he was an only 

child and the idol of both his parents, who builded high their 

hopes of his future success, and who survive this disgrace, but 

are broken-hearted. 

 

"The next case is that of the Rev. T.W., professor at the 

University of ----. Mr. W. is a scholarly gentleman, affable in 

his address, eloquent in his oratory, and a fine classical 

scholar. He was exposed by some of his students, who, to use a 

slang phrase, accused him of being a 'head-worker.' At his 

examination by the faculty he confessed his weakness, and said 

he could not control his unholy passion. His resignation was 

accepted both by the church and the college, and he left. 

 

"I know of a few other cases that have their peculiar traits, and 

am confident that these persons did not become possessed of this 

habit through the so-called 'indiscretions of youth,' as in every 

case their early life was freer from contamination than that of 

90 per cent. of the boys who, on reaching man's estate, have, 

like myself, no desire to deviate from the old-fashioned way 

formulated by our ancient sire, Adam." 

 

It can scarcely be said that the consciousness of this attitude of society 

is favorable to the invert's attainment of a fairly sane and well-balanced 

state of mind. This is, indeed, one of the great difficulties in his way, 


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