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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

yet it abounds, chiefly, it seems, among the lowest in the community; 

although the law is silent, social feeling is strong, and when--as has 

been the case in one instance--a man of undoubted genius has his name 

associated with this perversion it becomes difficult or impossible for the 

admirers of his work to associate with him personally; very few cases of 

homosexuality have been recorded in France among the more intelligent 

classes; the literature of homosexuality is there little more than the 

literature of male prostitution, as described by police-officials, and as 

carried on largely for the benefit of foreigners. In Germany and Austria, 

where the law against homosexuality is severe, it abounds also, perhaps 

to a much greater extent than in France;[272] it certainly asserts itself 

more vigorously; a far greater number of cases have been recorded than in 

any other country, and the German literature of homosexuality is very 

extensive, often issued in popular form, and sometimes enthusiastically 

eulogistic. In England the law is exceptionally severe; yet, according to 

the evidence of those who have an international acquaintance with these 

matters, homosexuality is fully as prevalent as on the Continent; some 

would say that it is more so. Much the same is true of the United States, 

though there is less to be seen on the surface. It cannot, therefore, be 

said that legislative enactments have very much influence on the 

prevalence of homosexuality. The chief effect seems to be that the attempt 

at suppression arouses the finer minds among sexual inverts to undertake 

the enthusiastic defense of homosexuality, while coarser minds are 

stimulated to cynical bravado.[273] 

 

As regards the prevalence of homosexuality in the United States, 

I may quote from a well-informed American correspondent:-- 

 

"The great prevalence of sexual inversion in American cities is 

shown by the wide knowledge of its existence. Ninety-nine normal 

men out of a hundred have been accosted on the streets by 

inverts, or have among their acquaintances men whom they know to 

be sexually inverted. Everyone has seen inverts and knows what 

they are. The public attitude toward them is generally a negative 

one--indifference, amusement, contempt. 

 

"The world of sexual inverts is, indeed, a large one in any 

American city, and it is a community distinctly organized--words, 

customs, traditions of its own; and every city has its numerous 

meeting-places: certain churches where inverts congregate; 

certain cafes well known for the inverted character of their 

patrons; certain streets where, at night, every fifth man is an 

invert. The inverts have their own 'clubs,' with nightly 

meetings. These 'clubs' are, really, dance-halls, attached to 

_saloons_, and presided over by the proprietor of the saloon, 

himself almost invariably an invert, as are all the waiters and 

musicians. The frequenters of these places are male sexual 

inverts (usually ranging from 17 to 30 years of age); sightseers 

find no difficulty in gaining entrance; truly, they are welcomed 

for the drinks they buy for the company--and other reasons. 

Singing and dancing turns by certain favorite performers are the 

features of these gatherings, with much gossip and drinking at 

the small tables ranged along the four walls of the room. The 

habitues of these places are, generally, inverts of the most 

pronounced type, i.e., the completely feminine in voice and 

manners, with the characteristic hip motion in their walk; though 

I have never seen any approach to feminine dress there, doubtless 

the desire for it is not wanting and only police regulations 

relegate it to other occasions and places. You will rightly infer 

that the police know of these places and endure their existence 

for a consideration; it is not unusual for the inquiring stranger 

to be directed there by a policeman." 

 

The Oscar Wilde trial (see _ante_, p. 48), with its wide 

publicity, and the fundamental nature of the questions it 

suggested, appears to have generally contributed to give 

definiteness and self-consciousness to the manifestations of 


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