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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

homosexuality, and to have aroused inverts to take up a definite 

attitude. I have been assured in several quarters that this is so 

and that since that case the manifestations of homosexuality have 

become more pronounced. One correspondent writes:-- 

 

"Up to the time of the Oscar Wilde trial I had not known what the 

condition of the law was. The moral question in itself--its 

relation to my own life and that of my friends--I reckoned I had 

solved; but I now had to ask myself how far I was justified in 

not only breaking the law, but in being the cause of a like 

breach in others, and others younger than myself. I have never 

allowed the _dictum_ of the law to interfere with what I deemed 

to be a moral development in any youth for whom I am responsible. 

I cannot say that the trial made me alter my course of life, of 

the rightness of which I was too convincingly persuaded, but it 

made me much more careful, and it probably sharpened my sense of 

responsibility for the young. Reviewing the results of the trial 

as a whole, it doubtless did incalculable harm, and it 

intensified our national vice of hypocrisy. But I think it also 

may have done some good in that it made those who, like myself, 

have thought and experienced deeply in the matter--and these must 

be no small few--ready to strike a blow, when the time comes, 

for what we deem to be right, honorable, and clean." 

 

From America a lady writes with reference to the moral position 

of inverts, though without allusion to the Wilde trial:-- 

 

"Inverts should have the courage and independence to be 

themselves, and to demand an investigation. If one strives to 

live honorably, and considers the greatest good to the greatest 

number, it is not a crime nor a disgrace to be an invert. I do 

not need the law to defend me, neither do I desire to have any 

concessions made for me, nor do I ask my friends to sacrifice 

their ideals for me. I too have ideals which I shall always hold. 

All that I desire--and I claim it as my right--is the freedom to 

exercise this divine gift of loving, which is not a menace to 

society nor a disgrace to me. Let it once be understood that the 

average invert is not a moral degenerate nor a mental degenerate, 

but simply a man or a woman who is less highly specialized, less 

completely differentiated, than other men and women, and I 

believe the prejudice against them will disappear, and if they 

live uprightly they will surely win the esteem and consideration 

of all thoughtful people. I know what it means to an invert--who 

feels himself set apart from the rest of mankind--to find one 

human heart who trusts him and understands him, and I know how 

almost impossible this is, and will be, until the world is made 

aware of these facts." 

 

But, while the law has had no more influence in repressing abnormal 

sexuality than, wherever it has tried to do so, it has had in repressing 

the normal sexual instinct, it has served to foster another offense. What 

is called blackmailing in England, _chantage_ in France, and _Erpressung_ 

in Germany--in other words, the extortion of money by threats of exposing 

some real or fictitious offense--finds its chief field of activity in 

connection with homosexuality.[274] No doubt the removal of the penalty 

against simple homosexuality does not abolish blackmailing, as the 

existence of this kind of _chantage_ in France shows, but it renders its 

success less probable. 

 

On all these grounds, and taking into consideration the fact that the 

tendency of modern legislation generally, and the consensus of 

authoritative opinion in all countries, are in this direction, it seems 

reasonable to conclude that neither "sodomy" (i.e., _immissio membri in 

anum hominis vel mulieris_) nor "gross indecency" ought to be penal 

offenses, except under certain special circumstances. That is to say, that 

if two persons of either or both sexes, having reached years of 

discretion,[275] privately consent to practise some perverted mode of 

sexual relationship, the law cannot be called upon to interfere. It should 


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