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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

utility of the treatment, but even the legitimacy of attempting it. The 

treatment of sexual inversion, he declared, is as much outside the 

province of medicine as the restoration of color-vision in the 

color-blind. The ideal which the physician and the teacher must place 

before the invert is that of chastity; he must seek to harness his wagon 

to a star. 

 

[258] I have been told by a distinguished physician, who was consulted in 

the case, of a congenital invert highly placed in the English government 

service, who married in the hope of escaping his perversion, and was not 

even able to consummate the marriage. It is needless to insist on the 

misery which is created in such cases. It is not, of course, denied that 

such marriages may not sometimes become eventually happy. Thus Kiernan 

("Psychical Treatment of Congenital Sexual Inversion," _Review of Insanity 

and Nervous Diseases_, June, 1894) reports the case of a thoroughly 

inverted girl who married the brother of the friend to whom she was 

previously attached merely in order to secure his sister's companionship. 

She was able to endure and even enjoy intercourse by imagining that her 

husband, who resembled his sister, was another sister. Liking and esteem 

for the husband gradually increased and after the sister died a child was 

born who much resembled her; "the wife's esteem passed through love of the 

sister to intense natural love of the daughter, as resembling the sister; 

through this to normal love of the husband as the father and brother." The 

final result may have been satisfactory, but this train of circumstances 

could not have been calculated beforehand. Moll is also opposed, on the 

whole (e.g., _Deutsche medicinische Presse_, No. 6, 1902), to marriage and 

procreation by inverts. 

 

[259] Hirschfeld, _Die Homosexualitaet_, ch. xxi. It might seem on 

theoretical grounds that the marriage of a homosexual man with a 

homosexual woman might turn out well. Hirschfeld, however, states that he 

knows of 14 such marriages, and the theoretical expectation has not been 

justified; 3 of the cases speedily terminated in divorce, 4 of the couples 

lived separately, and all but 2 of the remaining couples regretted the 

step they had taken. I may add that in such a case even the expectation of 

happiness scarcely seems reasonable, since neither of the parties can feel 

a true mating impulse toward the other. 

 

[260] Hirschfeld also notes (_Die Homosexualitaet_, p. 95) that women often 

instinctively feel that there is something wrong in the love of their 

inverted husbands who may perhaps succeed in copulating, but betray their 

deepest feelings by a repugnance to touch the sexual parts with the hand. 

The homosexual woman, also, as Hirschfeld elsewhere points out with cases 

in illustration (p. 84), may suffer seriously through being subjected to 

normal sexual relationships. 

 

[261] Fere reports the case of an invert of great intellectual ability who 

had never had any sexual relationships, and was not averse from a chaste 

life; he was urged by his doctor to acquire the power of normal 

intercourse and to marry, on the ground that his perversion was merely a 

perversion of the imagination. He did so, and, though he married a 

perfectly strong and healthy woman, and was himself healthy, except in so 

far as his perversion was concerned, the offspring turned out 

disastrously. The eldest child was an epileptic, almost an imbecile, and 

with strongly marked homosexual impulses; the second and third children 

were absolute idiots; the youngest died of convulsions in infancy (Fere, 

_L'Instinct Sexuel_, p. 269 et seq.) No doubt this is not an average case, 

but the numerous examples of the offspring of similar marriages brought 

forward by Hirschfeld (op. cit., p. 391) scarcely present a much better 

result. 

 

[262] It is scarcely necessary to add that the same principle is adaptable 

to the case of homosexual women. "In all such cases," writes an American 

woman physician, "I would recommend that the moral sense be trained and 

fostered, and the persons allowed to keep their individuality, being 

taught to remember always that they are different from others, rather 

sacrificing their own feelings or happiness when necessary. It is good 


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