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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

discipline for them, and will serve in the long run to bring them more 

favor and affection than any other course. This quality or idiosyncrasy is 

not essentially evil, but, if rightly used, may prove a blessing to others 

and a power for good in the life of the individual; nor does it reflect 

any discredit upon its possessor." 

 

[263] The existence of an affinity between homosexuality and the religious 

temperament has been referred to in ch. i as recognized in many parts of 

the world. See, for a more extended discussion, Horneffer, _Der Priester_, 

and Bloch, _Die Prostitution_, vol. i, pp. 101-110. The psychoanalysts 

have also touched on this point; thus Pfister, _Die Frommingkeit des 

Grafen von Zinzendorf_ (1910), argues that the founder of the pietistic 

sect of the Herrenhuter was of sublimated homosexual (or bisexual) 

temperament. 

 

[264] Forel, _Die Sexuelle Frage_, p. 528. Such ideas are, of course, 

often put forward by inverts themselves. 

 

[265] Roman law previously seems to have been confined in this matter to 

the protection of boys. The Scantinian and other Roman laws against 

paiderasty seem to have been usually a dead letter. See, for various notes 

and references, W.G. Holmes, _The Age of Justinian and Theodora_, vol. i, 

p. 121. 

 

[266] Epistle to the Romans, chapter i, verses 26-7. 

 

[267] In practice this penalty of death appears to have been sometimes 

commuted to ablation of the sexual organs. 

 

[268] For a full sketch of the legal enactments against homosexual 

intercourse in ancient and modern times, see Numa Praetorius, "Die 

straflichen Bestimmungen gegen den gleichgeschlechtlichen Verkehr," 

_Jahrbuch fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, vol. i, pp. 97-158. This writer 

points out that Justinian, and still more clearly, Pius V, in the 

sixteenth century, distinguished between occasional homosexuality and 

deep-rooted inversion, habitual offenders alone, not those who had only 

been guilty once or twice, being punished. 

 

[269] The influence of the supposed connection of sodomy with unbelief, 

idolatry, and heresy in arousing the horror of it among earlier religions 

has been emphasized by Westermarck, _The Origin and Development of the 

Moral Ideas_, vol. i, p. 486 et seq. 

 

[270] "Any male person who in public or private commits, or is a party to 

the commission of, or procures or attempts to procure the commission by 

any male person of, any act of gross indecency with another male person, 

shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, being convicted thereof, shall be 

liable at the discretion of the court to be imprisoned for any term not 

exceeding two years, with or without hard labor." 

 

[271] This point is brought forward by Dr. Leon de Rode in his report on 

"L'Inversion Genitale et la Legislation," prepared for the Third 

(Brussels) Congress of Criminal Anthropology in 1892. The same point is 

insisted on by some of my correspondents. 

 

[272] It is a remarkable and perhaps significant fact that, while 

homosexuality is today in absolute disrepute in France, it was not so 

under the less tolerant law of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

The Duc de Gesvres, as described by Besenval (_Memoires_, i, p. 178), was 

a well-marked invert of feminine type, impotent, and publicly affecting 

all the manners of women; yet he was treated with consideration. In 1687 

Madame, the mother of the Regent, writes implying that "all the young men 

and many of the old" practised pederasty: _il n'y a que les gens du commun 

qui aiment les femmes_. The marked tendency to inversion in the French 

royal family at this time is well known. 

 

[273] A man with homosexual habits, I have been told, declared he would be 

sorry to see the English law changed, as then he would find no pleasure in 

his practices. 

 

[274] Blackmailing appears to be the most serious risk which the invert 

runs. Hirschfeld states in an interesting study of blackmailing (_Jahrbuch 

fuer sexuelle Zwischenstufen_, April, 1913) that his experience shows that 

among 10,000 homosexual persons hardly one falls a victim to the law, but 

over 3000 are victimized by blackmailers. 

 

[275] Krafft-Ebing would place this age not under 16, the age at which in 

England girls may legally consent to normal sexual intercourse 


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