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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

although such strong friendships may involve an element of sexual emotion, 

we have no true and definite homosexual impulse; homosexuality is merely 

simulated by the ardent and hyperesthetic emotions of the poet.[91] The 

same quality of the poet's emotional temperament may doubtless, also, be 

invoked in the case of Goethe, who is said to have written elegies which, 

on account of their homosexual character, still remain unpublished. 

 

The most famous homosexual trial of recent times in England was that of 

Oscar Wilde, a writer whose literary reputation may be said to be still 

growing, not only in England but throughout the world. Wilde was the son 

of parents who were both of unusual ability and somewhat eccentric. Both 

these tendencies became in him more concentrated. He was born with, as it 

were, a congenital antipathy to the commonplace, a natural love of 

paradox, and he possessed the skill to embody the characteristic in 

finished literary form. At the same time, it must not be forgotten, 

beneath this natural attitude of paradox, his essential judgments on life 

and literature were usually sound and reasonable. His essay on "The Soul 

of Man Under Socialism" witnessed to his large and enlightened conception 

of life, and his profound admiration for Flaubert to the sanity and 

solidity of his literary taste. In early life he revealed no homosexual 

tendencies; he married and had children. After he had begun to outgrow his 

youthful esthetic extravagances, however, and to acquire success and fame, 

he developed what was at first a simply inquisitive interest in inversion. 

Such inquisitive interest is sometimes the sign of an emerging homosexual 

impulse. It proved to be so in Wilde's case and ultimately he was found to 

be cultivating the acquaintance of youths of low class and doubtful 

character. Although this development occurred comparatively late in life, 

we must hesitate to describe Wilde's homosexuality as acquired. If we 

consider his constitution and his history, it is not difficult to suppose 

that homosexual germs were present in a latent form from the first, and it 

may quite well be that Wilde's inversion was of that kind which is now 

described as retarded, though still congenital. 

 

As is usual in England, no active efforts were made to implicate Wilde in 

any criminal charge. It was his own action, as even he himself seems to 

have vaguely realized beforehand, which brought the storm about his head. 

He was arrested, tried, condemned, and at once there arose a general howl 

of execration, joined in even by the judge, whose attitude compared 

unfavorably with the more impartial attitude of the eighteenth century 

judges in similar cases. Wilde came out of prison ambitious to retrieve 

his reputation by the quality of his literary work. But he left Reading 

gaol merely to enter a larger and colder prison. He soon realized that his 

spirit was broken even more than his health. He drifted at last to Paris, 

where he shortly after died, shunned by all but a few of his friends.[92] 

 

In a writer of the first order, Edward Fitzgerald, to whom we owe the 

immortal and highly individualized version of _Omar Khayyam_, it is easy 

to trace an element of homosexuality, though it appears never to have 

reached full and conscious development. Fitzgerald was an eccentric person 

who, though rich and on friendly terms with some of the most distinguished 

men of his time, was always out of harmony with his environment. He felt 

himself called on to marry, very unhappily, a woman whom he had never been 

in love with and with whom he had nothing in common. All his affections 

were for his male friends. In early life he was devoted to his friend W.K. 

Browne, whom he glorified in _Euphranor_. "To him Browne was at once 

Jonathan, Gamaliel, Apollo,--the friend, the master, the God,--there was 

scarcely a limit to his devotion and admiration."[93] On Browne's 

premature death Fitzgerald's heart was empty. In 1859 at Lowestoft, 

Fitzgerald, as he wrote to Mrs. Browne, "used to wander about the shore at 

night longing for some fellow to accost me who might give some promise of 

filling up a very vacant place in my heart." It was then that he met 

"Posh" (Joseph Fletcher), a fisherman, 6 feet tall, said to be of the best 


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