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Table of contents
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION-1.1
INTRODUCTION-1.2
INTRODUCTION-1.3
INTRODUCTION-1.4
INTRODUCTION-1.5
INTRODUCTION-1.6
INTRODUCTION-1.7
FOOTNOTES-1
FOOTNOTES-2
THE STUDY OF SEXUAL INVERSION
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN MEN-3
HISTORY-1-2-3-4
HISTORY-5
HISTORY-6
HISTORY-7-8
HISTORY-9
HISTORY-10-11-12
HISTORY-13-14
HISTORY-15
HISTORY-16-17-18-19
HISTORY-20
HISTORY-21 (begin)
HISTORY-21 (end)
HISTORY-22-23-24
HISTORY-25
HISTORY-26
HISTORY-27
HISTORY-28-29-30-31-32
HISTORY-33
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-1
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-2
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-3
SEXUAL INVERSION IN WOMEN-4
HISTORY-34-35-36-37
HISTORY-38
HISTORY-39.1
HISTORY-39.2
HISTORY-39.3
HISTORY-39.4
FOOTNOTES
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
THE NATURE OF SEXUAL INVERSION-4
FOOTNOTES
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-1
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-2
THE THEORY OF SEXUAL INVERSION-3
CONCLUSIONS-1
CONCLUSIONS-2
CONCLUSIONS-3
CONCLUSIONS-4
FOOTNOTES
APPENDIX A
APPENDIX B-1
APPENDIX B-2-3-4
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Suffolk type, both in body and character. Posh reminded Fitzgerald of his 

dead friend Browne; he made him captain of his lugger, and was thereafter 

devoted to him. Posh was, said Fitzgerald, "a man of the finest Saxon 

type, with a complexion _vif, male et flamboyant_, blue eyes, a nose less 

than Roman, more than Greek, and strictly auburn hair that any woman might 

envy. Further he was a man of simplicity; of soul, justice of thought, 

tenderness of nature, a gentleman of Nature's grandest type," in fact the 

"greatest man" Fitzgerald had ever met. Posh was not, however, quite so 

absolutely perfect as this description suggests, and various 

misunderstandings arose in consequence between the two friends so unequal 

in culture and social traditions. These difficulties are reflected in some 

of the yet extant letters from the enormous mass which Fitzgerald 

addressed to "my dear Poshy."[94] 

 

A great personality of recent times, widely regarded with reverence as the 

prophet-poet of Democracy[95]--Walt Whitman--has aroused discussion by his 

sympathetic attitude toward passionate friendship, or "manly love" as he 

calls it, in _Leaves of Grass_. In this book--in "Calamus," "Drumtaps," 

and elsewhere--Whitman celebrates a friendship in which physical contact 

and a kind of silent voluptuous emotion are essential elements. In order 

to settle the question as to the precise significance of "Calamus," J.A. 

Symonds wrote to Whitman, frankly posing the question. The answer (written 

from Camden, N.J., on August 19, 1890) is the only statement of Whitman's 

attitude toward homosexuality, and it is therefore desirable that it 

should be set on record:-- 

 

"About the questions on 'Calamus,' etc., they quite daze me. 

_Leaves of Grass_ is only to be rightly construed by and within 

its own atmosphere and essential character--all its pages and 

pieces so coming strictly under. That the 'Calamus' part has ever 

allowed the possibility of such construction as mentioned is 

terrible. I am fain to hope that the pages themselves are not to 

be even mentioned for such gratuitous and quite at the time 

undreamed and unwished possibility of morbid inferences--which 

are disavowed by me and seem damnable." 

 

It would seem from this letter[96] that Whitman had never realized that 

there is any relationship whatever between the passionate emotion of 

physical contact from man to man, as he had experienced it and sung it, 

and the act which with other people he would regard as a crime against 

nature. This may be singular, for there are many inverted persons who have 

found satisfaction in friendships less physical and passionate than those 

described in _Leaves of Grass_, but Whitman was a man of concrete, 

emotional, instinctive temperament, lacking in analytical power, receptive 

to all influences, and careless of harmonizing them. He would most 

certainly have refused to admit that he was the subject of inverted 

sexuality. It remains true, however, that "manly love" occupies in his 

work a predominance which it would scarcely hold in the feelings of the 

"average man," whom Whitman wishes to honor. A normally constituted 

person, having assumed the very frank attitude taken up by Whitman, would 

be impelled to devote far more space and far more ardor to the subject of 

sexual relationships with women and all that is involved in maternity than 

is accorded to them in _Leaves of Grass_. Some of Whitman's extant letters 

to young men, though they do not throw definite light on this question, 

are of a very affectionate character,[97] and, although a man of 

remarkable physical vigor, he never felt inclined to marry.[98] It remains 

somewhat difficult to classify him from the sexual point of view, but we 

can scarcely fail to recognize the presence of a homosexual tendency. 

 

I should add that some friends and admirers of Whitman are not 

prepared to accept the evidence of the letter to Symonds. I am 

indebted to "Q." for the following statement of the objections:-- 

 

"I think myself that it is a mistake to give much weight to this 

letter--perhaps a mistake to introduce it at all, since if 

introduced it will, of course, carry weight. And this for three 


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